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Medical Dictionaries (General)

NIH National Library of Medicine - NLM

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) was established in 1836 as the library of the Army Surgeon General's Office. It was transferred to the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and became known as NLM in 1956. In support of its mission to collect, preserve, and disseminate biomedical information, NLM has assembled the largest collection of biomedical literature in the world. Included are over 8 million books, journals, technical reports, and other print and audiovisual materials, as well as the nation's largest medical history collection. Services of NLM include computer-based literature retrieval services, interlibrary loan services, programs and grant support for medical libraries, toxicology information services and biotechnology information services. Eight major libraries around the country, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) coordinate online reference retrieval and interlibrary loan services for libraries in their region. DATABASES: Free access to MEDLINE, MEDLINEplus (Consumer health information), and other NLM databases are available to those with World Wide Web access at: www.nlm.nih.gov. Fact sheets and pocket guides describing the databases are available. A MEDLARS management service desk at NLM is staffed to answer questions about the online system.

Review Date: August 18, 2011

List reviewed web resources

World Health Organization

The World Health Organization (WHO) came into being on April 7, 1948 when the 26th United Nations member ratified its Constitution. The objective of WHO is the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health. In support of its main objective, the WHO has a wide range of functions including the following: to act as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work; to promote technical cooperation; to assist Governments, upon request, in strengthening health services; to furnish appropriate technical assistance, and in emergencies, necessary aid; to stimulate and advance work on the prevention and control of epidemic, endemic and other diseases; to promote, in cooperation with other specialized agencies where necessary, the improvement of nutrition, housing, sanitation, recreation, economic or working conditions and other aspects of environmental hygiene; to promote and coordinate biomedical and health services research; to promote improved standards of teaching and training in the health, medical and related professions; to establish and stimulate the establishment of international standards for biological, pharmaceutical and similar products, and to standardize diagnostic procedures; and to foster activities in the field of mental health, especially those activities affecting the harmony of human relations. WHO also proposes conventions, agreements, regulations and makes recommendations about international nomenclature of diseases, causes of death and public health practices. It develops, establishes and promotes international standards concerning foods and biological, pharmaceutical and similar substances.

Review Date: January 05, 2009

List reviewed web resources

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