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Toxic Substances

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Information Center, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ATSDR serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. ATSDR is directed by congressional mandate to perform specific functions concerning the effect on public health of hazardous substances in the environment. These functions include public health assessments of waste sites, health consultations concerning specific hazardous substances, health surveillance and registries, response to emergency releases of hazardous substances, applied research in support of public health assessments, information development and dissemination, and education and training concerning hazardous substances.

Review Date: June 22, 2011

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NIH National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences - NIEHS

The mission of the NIEHS is to reduce the burden of human illness and disability by understanding how the environment influences the development and progression of human disease. To have the greatestimpact on preventing disease and improving human health, the NIEHS focuses on basic science, disease-oriented research, global environmental health, and multidisciplinary training for researchers. The NIEHS achieves its mission through: Extramural research and training, funded by grants and contracts, to scientists, environmental health professionals, and other groups worldwide, Intramural research conducted by scientists at the NIEHS facility and in partnership with scientists at universities and hospitals, Toxicological testing and test validation by the National Toxicology Program, and Outreach and communications programs that provide reliable health information to the public and scientific resources to researchers.

Review Date: July 12, 2011

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Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created to encourage employers and employees to reduce workplace hazards and implement new or improved safety and health programs; establish separate but dependent responsibilities and rights for employers and employees to achieve better safety and health conditions; maintain a reporting and record-keeping system to monitor job-related injuries and illnesses; develop mandatory job safety and health standards and enforce them; and provide for the development, analysis, evaluation, and approval of State occupational safety and health programs. The Act provides six distinct provisions for protecting the safety and health of Federal workers on the job. OSHA also encourages a broad range of voluntary workplace improvement efforts, including consultation programs, training and education efforts, grants to establish safety and health competence, and a variety of similar programs.

Review Date: June 08, 2011

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U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

This Board's mandate is improve worker and community safety through: conducting investigations and reporting on findings regarding causes of chemical accidents at fixed facilities;" evaluating and advising Congress on the effectiveness of and any duplication of effort among 14 other federal agencies in preventing industrial chemical accidents; conducting special studies; and developing and communicating recommended actions (based on research and investigative findings) to improve the safety of operations involved in the production, transportation, and industrial handling, use and disposal of chemicals.

Review Date: December 15, 2008

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. FDA is also responsible for advancing the public health by helping to speed innovations that make medicines more effective, safer, and more affordable and by helping the public get the accurate, science-based information they need to use medicines and foods to maintain and improve their health. FDA regulates the manufacturing, marketing and distribution of tobacco products to protect the public health and to reduce tobacco use by minors. Finally, FDA plays a significant role in the Nation’s counterterrorism capability. FDA fulfills this responsibility by ensuring the security of the food supply and by fostering development of medical products to respond to deliberate and naturally emerging public health threats.

Review Date: August 08, 2011

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Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) is a non-profit health organization dedicated to finding a cure for and controlling asthma and allergies. Founded in 1953, AAFA serves the 60 million Americans with asthma and allergic diseases by supporting scientific research, patient education programs, public and governmental advocacy and a network of chapters and educational support groups throughout the nation. Complementing these efforts is AAFA's Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month activities each May and ongoing public education campaigns.

Review Date: March 28, 2011

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National Service Center for Environmental Publications

The EPA offers a wide range of publications in English and in many foreign languages. Search for and order publications from this Web site.

Review Date: July 27, 2012

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