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Cancer Screening

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting public health activities in the United States. CDC's Mission is to collaborate to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health – through health promotion, prevention of disease, injury and disability, and preparedness for new health threats. CDC is composed of the Office of the Director, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Center for Global Health, and five Offices, including Public Health Preparedness and Response; State and Local Support; Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services; Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health; and Infectious Diseases. CDC employs more than 15,000 employees in more than 50 countries and in 168 occupational categories.

Review Date: February 27, 2013

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Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is a leader in nationwide efforts to ease the burden of cancer. Through the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC), CDC works with national cancer organizations, state health agencies, and other key groups to develop, implement, and promote effective strategies for preventing and controlling cancer. CDC provides funding and assistance to help states, tribes/tribal organizations, and territories collect data on cancer incidence and deaths, cancer risk factors, and the use of cancer screening tests. Public health professionals use the data to identify and track cancer trends, strengthen cancer prevention and control activities, and prioritize the use of resources. CDC develops communication campaigns and materials designed to teach health professionals, policy makers, the media, and the public about cancer prevention and control.

Review Date: July 13, 2011

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American Academy of Family Physicians

The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), originally the American Academy of General Practice, was founded in 1947 and has chapters in all States. Its purpose is to represent the interests of family physicians, provide opportunities for continuing education, and maintain high standards of family practice care. AAFP requires continuing education from its members and promotes the development of family practice medical education. A public education program is conducted to inform the public about family practice. Other activities include medical student services, annual meetings, and reduced insurance rates.

Review Date: July 01, 2009

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American Cancer Society

The American Cancer Society (ACS) was originally established as the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1913, and became the ACS in 1945. ACS is the voluntary organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem. It conducts and supports programs of research, education, and service to the cancer patient. The Society's immediate goal of saving more lives is served through educating the public about prevention and early detection of cancer, the importance of prompt treatment, and the possibilities of cure, through educating the medical profession to the latest advances in diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and through direct service to the cancer patient and the patient's family. Public education activities include a toll-free cancer information services publication of a variety of pamphlets, educational programs conducted in schools and communities, and presentation of materials in the mass media. The Society has a comprehensive professional education program designed to motivate physicians, dentists, and nurses to use the best cancer management techniques. The Society conducts service and rehabilitation programs for cancer patients and their families. ACS supports cancer research through several types of research grants and disseminates the research results. ACS has 17 divisions as well as over 3400 local units.

Review Date: June 25, 2009

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Gynecologic Cancer Foundation

The mission of the Gynecologic Cancer Foundation (GCF) is to ensure public awareness of gynecologic cancer prevention, early diagnosis and proper treatment as well as supports research and training related to gynecologic cancers. GCF advances this mission by increasing public and private funds that aid in the development and implementation of programs to meet these goals. All members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO) are members of the Gynecologic Cancer Foundation (GCF). They are financially separate although they jointly fund some projects. The SGO works primarily with physicians and other health professionals, whereas the GCF's efforts are directed toward the public. They are viewed as complementary organizations.

Review Date: May 04, 2009

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NIH National Cancer Institute

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is one of 11 agencies that compose the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The NCI is the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training. It coordinates the National Cancer Program, which conducts and supports research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to the cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer, rehabilitation from cancer, and the continuing care of cancer patients and the families of cancer patients.

Review Date: August 03, 2011

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