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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting public health activities in the United States. CDC's Mission is to collaborate to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health – through health promotion, prevention of disease, injury and disability, and preparedness for new health threats. CDC is composed of the Office of the Director, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Center for Global Health, and five Offices, including Public Health Preparedness and Response; State and Local Support; Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services; Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health; and Infectious Diseases. CDC employs more than 15,000 employees in more than 50 countries and in 168 occupational categories.

Review Date: February 27, 2013

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NIH National Human Genome Research Institute - NHGRI

The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) led the National Institutes of Health's contribution to the International Human Genome Project, which had as its primary goal the sequencing of the human genome. This project was successfully completed in April 2003. NHGRI's mission has expanded to encompass a broad range of studies aimed at understanding the structure and function of the human genome and its role in health and disease. NHGRI supports the development of resources and technology that will accelerate genome research and its application to human health. A critical part of the NHGRI mission continues to be the study of the ethical, legal and social implications of genome research. NHGRI also supports the training of investigators and the dissemination of genome information to the public and to health professionals.

Review Date: July 20, 2011

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Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG) aims to integrate genomics into public health research, policy, and programs, which could improve interventions designed to prevent and control the country’s leading chronic, infectious, environmental, and occupational diseases.

Review Date: August 01, 2011

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American Society of Human Genetics

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) is a professional membership organization for human genetics specialists worldwide. The Society currently has nearly 8,000 active members, including researchers, clinicians, academicians, ethicists, genetic counselors, nurses and others who have a special interest in the field of human genetics. ASHG serves human genetics professionals, health care providers, and the general public by providing forums to share research results, advance genetic research, enhance genetics education, promote genetic services and support responsible social and scientific policies.

Review Date: November 25, 2011

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Genetic Alliance

Genetic Alliance is a nonprofit health advocacy organization committed to transforming health through genetics and promoting an environment of openness centered on the health of individuals, families, and communities. Genetic Alliance’s network includes more than 1,000 disease-specific advocacy organizations, as well as thousands of universities, private companies, government agencies, and public policy organizations.

Review Date: October 24, 2011

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National Society of Genetic Counselors

The National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) promotes the professional interests of genetic counselors and provides a network for professional communications. Local and national continuing education opportunities and the discussion of all issues relevant to human genetics and the genetic counseling profession are an integral part of belonging to the NSGC. Growth and development within the profession and the recognition of a unique identity provided the impetus for the formation of a responsive professional society. To that end, the National Society of Genetic Counselors was incorporated in 1979. The National Society of Genetic Counselors advances the various roles of genetic counselors in health care by fostering education, research, and public policy to ensure the availability of quality genetic services.

Review Date: January 27, 2012

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