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Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Navy Medicine, U.S. Department of the Navy

An Act of Congress established the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) as part of the Department of the Navy on August 31, 1842. BUMED is the central administrative organization of the Medical Department, located in Washington, D. C. The first Naval Medical Center occupied the site from 1931 to 1942, when it was moved to Bethesda, Maryland. BUMED has liaison activities with other bureaus and offices with respect to the design, sanitary conditions, and medical facilities aboard ships and in hospitals.

Review Date: March 30, 2012

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Bureau of Primary Health Care, Health Resources and Services Administration

HRSA’s Primary Health Care Programs have their roots in the Migrant Health Act of 1962 and the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, which established funding for the first community-based clinics that were to become today’s Health Center Program. HRSA has helped fund, staff and support a national network of health clinics serving millions of people who otherwise would have little or no access to care. The National Hansen’s Disease Program, formerly the National Leprosarium, was established in 1921. More recently, the Free Clinics Medical Malpractice Program was established in 2004.

Review Date: June 27, 2011

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Health Resources and Services Administration - HRSA
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for improving access to health care services for people who are uninsured, isolated or medically vulnerable. HRSA provides leadership and financial support to health care providers, and through its grantees, health care to uninsured people, people living with HIV/AIDS, and pregnant women, mothers and children. HRSA trains health professionals to improve systems of care in rural communities, and oversees organ, bone marrow and cord blood donation. It supports programs that prepare against bioterrorism, compensates individuals harmed by vaccination, and maintains databases that protect against health care malpractice and health care waste, fraud and abuse.

Review Date: July 26, 2011

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Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services, is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The provision of health services to members of federally-recognized tribes grew out of the special government-to-government relationship between the federal government and Indian tribes. This relationship, established in 1787, is based on Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, and has been given form and substance by numerous treaties, laws, Supreme Court decisions, and Executive Orders. The IHS is the principal federal health care provider and health advocate for Indian people, and its goal is to raise their health status to the highest possible level. The IHS provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives who belong to 566 federally recognized tribes in 35 states. Health services provided include medical, dental, and environmental health programs. Special program concentrations are in disease prevention and health promotion, alcoholism, substance abuse, suicide, accidents, maternal and child health, nutrition, and public health services.

Review Date: October 17, 2011

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Office of the Surgeon General of the Army, Department of Defense

Medical benefits programs for Army personnel and eligible civilians, including dependents, are developed and administered by the Office of the Surgeon General of the Army. The Office responds to inquiries about eligibility for benefits.

Review Date: April 11, 2014

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U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

The Veterans Administration was established in 1930 and elevated to cabinet level on March 15, 1989, and is now the Department of Veterans Affairs. The VA provides a wide range of veterans' benefits in such areas as health care, education, housing, disability pensions, and life insurance. Through its network of hospitals, clinics, and nursing homes, the VA provides a full range of medical, long-term care, and patient support services. Veterans with service-related illnesses or injuries receive priority for VA medical services, and special consideration is also given to veterans who are in financial need, over 65 years old, or holders of the Congressional Medal of Honor. The VA is also involved in medical research and the training of health professionals. Training programs include graduate, undergraduate, and continuing education, a medical library, and assistance for health manpower training institutions. VA benefits are restricted to U.S. military veterans.

Review Date: December 12, 2008

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Chinese Community Health Resource Center

The Chinese Community Health Resource Center (CCHRC) is a private, non-profit community center by the Chinese Community Health Care Association (a physicians’ independent practice association), Chinese Community Health Plan, and Chinese Hospital. The Center’s mission is to build a healthy community through culturally and linguistically competent preventive health, disease management, and research programs.

Review Date: December 06, 2010

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Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities

The mission of CARF is to promote the quality, value, and optimal outcomes of services through a consultative accreditation process that centers on enhancing the lives of the persons served. CARF develops and maintains current, field-driven standards that improve the value and responsiveness of the programs and services delivered to people in need of rehabilitation and other life enhancement services; recognizes organizations that achieve accreditation through a consultative peer-review process and demonstrate their commitment to the continuous improvement of their programs and services with a focus on the needs and outcomes of the persons served; conducts accreditation research emphasizing outcomes measurement and management; provides information on common program strengths as well as areas needing improvement; and provides consultation, education, training, and publications that support organizations in achieving and maintaining accreditation of their programs and services.

Review Date: July 16, 2008

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The Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Cleveland Clinic, located in Cleveland, Ohio, is a not-for-profit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Cleveland Clinic was founded in 1921 by four renowned physicians with a vision of providing outstanding patient care based upon the principles of cooperation, compassion and innovation. About 2,000 full-time salaried physicians and researchers and 7,600 nurses at Cleveland Clinic represent more than 100 medical specialties and subspecialties. In addition to its main campus, Cleveland Clinic operates nine regional hospitals in Northeast Ohio, Cleveland Clinic Florida, the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas and Cleveland Clinic Canada. In 2008, there were more than 4.2 million visits throughout the Cleveland Clinic health system and 165,000 hospital admissions. Patients came for treatment from every state and from more than 80 countries.

Review Date: April 15, 2010

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The Joint Commission

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations is a private, not for profit organization established in 1951 to evaluate health care organizations that voluntarily seek accreditation. The Joint Commission evaluates and accredits more than 16,000 health care organizations in the United States, including 4,400 hospitals, more than 3,900 home care entities, and over 7,000 other health care organizations that provide behavioral health care, laboratory, ambulatory care, and long term care services. The Joint Commission also evaluates and accredits health plans and health care networks. It is governed by representatives from the American College of Physicians, the American College of Surgeons, the American Dental Association, the American Hospital Association, the American Medical Association, an at-large nursing representative, six public members, and the Joint Commission President.

Review Date: October 06, 2010

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University of Maryland Medical Center

The University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), founded in 1823 as the Baltimore Infirmary, is one of the nation’s oldest academic medical centers. UMMC exists to serve the state and region as a tertiary/quaternary care center, to serve the local community with a full range of care options, to educate and train the next generation of health care providers, and to be a site for world-class clinical research.

Review Date: December 16, 2011

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