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Birth Control

Choose the Right Birth Control

Find out which birth control methods may be right for you.

Review Date: December 18, 2012

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

FAQs: Emergency Contraception (Emergency Birth Control)

Emergency contraception, or emergency birth control, is used to help keep a woman from getting pregnant after she has had sex without using birth control or if the birth control method failed. This page offers answers to frequently asked questions about emergency contraception.

Review Date: January 23, 2013

Office on Women's Health

Condom Fact Sheet in Brief

Consistent and correct use of the male latex condom reduces the risk of sexually transmitted disease (STD) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. This fact sheet describes how to use condoms correctly.

Review Date: January 19, 2012

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

About Birth Control: What Parents Need to Know

Kids may not feel comfortable approaching parents with questions about sexuality but let them know your views on sex and birth control. Knowing where you stand helps kids make choices that are right for them.

Review Date: March 13, 2012

The Nemours Foundation

About Toxic Shock Syndrome

Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious but uncommon infection caused by either Staphylococcus aureus bacteria or by streptococcus bacteria. Originally linked to the use of tampons, it is now also known to be associated with the diaphragm and other birth control methods.

Review Date: December 31, 2012

The Nemours Foundation

Abstinence

People are abstinent for many reasons, including to prevent pregnancy. Here are some of the most common questions we hear people ask about abstinence.

Review Date: October 07, 2014

Planned Parenthood Federation of America

All About Condoms

Currently, condoms are the only widely available, proven method for reducing transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) during intercourse. Find out how to use condoms correctly and consistently.

Review Date: January 23, 2012

American Social Health Association

Birth Control Guide- (PDF)

This guide gives the basic facts about the different kinds of FDA-approved medicines and devices for birth control. Ask your doctor to tell you about all of the risks and benefits of using these products.

Review Date: July 11, 2014

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Birth Control Methods Fact Sheet

What are the different types of birth control? Do they have side effects? Are birth control pills safe? Find answers to these questions, and more.

Review Date: January 19, 2012

Office on Women's Health

Birth Control Options: Things to Consider

Your birth control options may include oral contraceptives, barrier methods or natural family planning. Find out how to choose the method of contraception that works best for you.

Review Date: January 19, 2012

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research

Delaying Your Period Through Birth Control Pills

Menstrual manipulation refers to changing the way you take birth control pills so that you delay or stop menstruation.

Review Date: July 11, 2014

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research

Emergency Contraception: Fact Sheet

Emergency contraception is a way of preventing pregnancy after unprotected sex. Learn about how it works and how it is used. Emergency contraception offers no protection against sexually transmitted diseases.

Review Date: January 23, 2013

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Fact or Fiction: Pregnancy Prevention

There are so many myths about preventing pregnancy. These videos set the record straight.

Review Date: April 05, 2012

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

FAQs about Emergency Contraception

Emergency contraception is birth control that prevents pregnancy after sex, which is why it is sometimes called "the morning after pill," or "the day after pill." Emergency contraception makes it much less likely you will get pregnant.

Review Date: January 23, 2013

Educational Institution--Follow the Resource URL for More Information

Find a Family Planning Clinic

Family planning clinics across the country are available to provide women and men with reproductive health care. Find a clinic near you by city, state or zip code.

Review Date: July 14, 2014

Office of Family Planning, Office of Population Affairs

Find a Health Center - Planned Parenthood

Search from more than 820 health centers nationwide for a nearby health center that provides high-quality, affordable sexual and reproductive health care for women, men, and teens.

Review Date: October 30, 2014

Planned Parenthood Federation of America

Method Match

You are unique and so are your birth control needs. Use this tool to compare methods on the criteria that matter most to you.

Review Date: January 19, 2012

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals

My Method

Birth control methods are not one-size-fits-all. My method is here to help you think about your options. Information is available in English and Spanish.

Review Date: January 19, 2012

Planned Parenthood Federation of America

Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

A fact sheet about research on the risk of developing cancer of the breast, cervix, liver and ovary from the use of oral contraceptives.

Review Date: March 01, 2013

NIH National Cancer Institute

Sterilization for Women (Tubal Sterilization)

Read the answers to some of the most common questions about sterilization for women.

Review Date: November 26, 2014

Planned Parenthood Federation of America

Talking with a Partner About Condoms

Using condoms correctly and consistently is a key way to reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections and diseases. Don't be shy to talk with your partner about safer sex and condoms: For both of you, this is one of the most important conversations you can have.

Review Date: January 19, 2012

American Social Health Association

Tips for Using Condoms and Dental Dams

Find quick tips for using condoms and dental dams safely and effectively.

Review Date: January 25, 2012

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Tubal Ligation Reversal

A tubal ligation reversal can allow a woman who's had a tubal ligation to get pregnant without further medical assistance. A tubal ligation reversal isn't appropriate for everyone. Learn more about this procedure.

Review Date: December 31, 2012

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research

What Works/What Doesn't : Preventing Pregnancy and STD's

Use this site to compare the pros and cons of 10 birth control methods, including condoms, the pill, cervical caps, IUD's, and more.

Review Date: April 05, 2012

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation