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Abledata

AbleData provides information on assistive products and rehabilitation equipment for people with disabilities. AbleData's most significant resource is the AbleData database of assistive technology, which contains objective information on over 40,000 assistive products. Each product listing provides a detailed description of the product's functions and features, price information (when available), and contact information for the product's manufacturer and distributors. AbleData also offers information on non-commercial prototypes, customized and one-of-a-kind products, and do-it-yourself designs. All of AbleData’s information resources are available for free at www.abledata.com. Staff are available to respond to telephone, email or written requests, 8:30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. AbleData is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, U.S. Department of Education.

Review Date: December 23, 2010

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Access Board: United States Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board

Created in 1973, the Board is the federal agency which develops minimum guidelines and requirements for standards issued under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA), develops accessibility guidelines for telecommunications equipment and customer premises equipment under the Telecommunications Act, develops accessibility standards for electronic and information technology under section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, provides technical assistance on those guidelines and standards, and enforces the Architectural Barriers Act.

Review Date: December 12, 2008

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Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is a federal agency funding state, territory, local, and tribal organizations to provide family assistance (welfare), child support, child care, Head Start, child welfare, and other programs relating to children and families. Actual services are provided by state, county, city and tribal governments, and public and private local agencies. ACF assists these organizations through funding, policy direction, and information services.

Review Date: June 22, 2011

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Administration on Developmental Disabilities

The Administration on Developmental Disabilities (ADD) ensures that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to culturally competent services, supports, and other assistance and opportunities that promotes independence, productivity, and integration and inclusion into the community. ADD does not provide direct consumer support or financial assistance. ADD provides funding, monitoring, and policy guidance to it's programs Nationwide. To obtain services, contact the program offices in your state.

Review Date: June 22, 2011

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Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) advises the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services on policy development in health, disability, human services, data, and science, and provides advice and analysis on economic policy. ASPE leads special initiatives, coordinates the Department's evaluation, research and demonstration activities, and manages cross-Department planning activities such as strategic planning, legislative planning, and review of regulations. Integral to this role, ASPE conducts research and evaluation studies, develops policy analyses, and estimates the cost and benefits of policy alternatives under consideration by the Department or Congress.

Review Date: June 22, 2011

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Center for Information Technology Accommodation

The Center for Information Technology Accommodation (CITA) is a resource for information on the accessibility of electronic and information technology (EIT), and in the use of assistive technologies. CITA supports several programs that promote awareness of and provide solutions for disability legislation.

Review Date: April 18, 2014

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Clearinghouse on Disability Information, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

The Clearinghouse provides information to people with disabilities, or anyone requesting information, by doing research and providing documents in response to inquiries. The information provided includes areas of federal funding for disability-related programs. Clearinghouse staff is trained to serve as experts in referring requests to other sources of disability-related information, if necessary. This office is in the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) which is divided into three areas: the Office of Special Education Programs, the rehabilitation Services Administration, and the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Information provided may be useful to disabled individuals and their families, schools and universities, teacher's and/or school administrators, and organizations which have persons with disabilities as clients.

Review Date: September 11, 2011

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Disability and Health Programs, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities/CDC

Working within CDC's National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities' Division of Human Development and Disability, the mission of the Disability and Health Team is to promote the health, well-being, independence, productivity, and full participation in society by people with disabilities. Program activities include assessing and monitoring the prevalence of disability in the United States; assessing the health status of people with disabilities; describing the risk factors and costs associated with secondary conditions and poor health; developing health promotion interventions to reduce secondary health issues and reduce disparities between people with and without disabilities; evaluate the effectiveness and cost of health interventions; offering training to health professionals who are interested in the field of disability and public health; and supporting conferences to facilitate and stimulate dialogue, disseminate and exchange information, establish research and policy priorities, and outline and undertake next steps.

Review Date: July 13, 2011

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National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC

The mission of the CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) is to promote the health of babies, children and adults and enhance the potential for full, productive living. The center includes three divisions - the Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Human Development and Disability, and the Division of Blood Disorders. It works to identify the causes of birth defects and developmental disabilities; help children to develop and reach their full potential; and promote health and well-being among people of all ages with disabilities, including blood disorders. NCBDDD seeks to accomplish these goals through research, partnerships, and prevention and education programs. .

Review Date: July 13, 2011

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National Council on Disability

The National Council on Disability (NCD) is a small, independent federal agency charged with advising the President, Congress, and other federal agencies regarding policies, programs, practices, and procedures that affect people with disabilities. First established as a small advisory Council within the Department of Education in 1978, NCD was transformed into an independent agency in 1984 and is comprised of a team of fifteen Senate-confirmed Presidential appointees, an Executive Director appointed by the Chairman, and eleven, full-time professional staff.

Review Date: September 07, 2011

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National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities

NICHCY is the center that provides information (in English and Spanish) to the nation on: - disabilities in children and youth; - programs and services for infants, children, and youth with disabilities; - IDEA, the nation’s special education law; and - research-based information on effective practices for children with disabilities. NICHCY’s special focus is children and youth (birth to age 22). Anyone can use their services—families, educators, administrators, journalists, students.

Review Date: October 27, 2011

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National Information and Referral Support Center

The National Aging Information and Referral Support Center provides information and referral systems design and management, service delivery and professional staff development support to state and local aging networks. Training, technical assistance, product development and consultation are provided to build capacity and promote continuing development of aging information and referral services nationwide.

Review Date: April 03, 2014

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National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research - NIDRR
U.S. Department of Education

NIDRR's mission is to generate and disseminate research findings and promote knowledge that will improve the ability of individuals with disabilities to perform activities in the community, and increase their full participation in society. NIDRR conducts comprehensive and coordinated participation in programs of research and related activities to maximize the full inclusion, social integration, employment and independent living of individuals al all ages with disabilities. NIDRR's focus includes research in areas such as employment; health and function; technology for access and function; independent living and community integration and other associated disability research areas.

Review Date: November 21, 2008

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National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped - NLS
Library of Congress

Through a national network of cooperating libraries, NLS administers a free library program of braille and audio materials circulated to eligible residents in the United States and American citizens living abroad who cannot read standard print because of a temporary or permanent visual disability, or a physical disability that prevents holding the printed page. Material is sent by postage-free mail.

Review Date: September 15, 2011

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National Rehabilitation Information Center, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

National Rehabilitation Information Center, funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, was established in 1977 and provides information on rehabilitation and disability-related materials. NARIC prepares bibliographies tailored to specific requests, and assists in locating answers to questions such as places, names, addresses, and statistics. NARIC's collection includes materials relevant to disability and rehabilitation. The collection contains more than 200 periodical titles and more than 60,000 research reports, books, and audiovisual materials. Coordination and information exchange with other information resources is maintained. The public can use the NARIC collection or order materials from the Center. DATABASE: REHABDATA, an online computerized database, includes bibliographic information and abstracts for the entire NARIC collection, including materials produced from 1950 to the present. Direct access to the database is through the NARIC Web page. Customized searches are available for nominal fees. There is a charge for photo duplication.

Review Date: February 03, 2010

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NIH Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Information Resource Center

The NICHD is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The NICHD has primary responsibility for conducting and supporting basic, translational, and clinical research in the biomedical, behavioral, and social sciences related to child and maternal health, in medical rehabilitation, and in the reproductive sciences. Information specialists are available to respond to inquiries Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Review Date: July 26, 2011

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NIH National Institute of Child Health and Human Development - NICHD

The NICHD is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The NICHD has primary responsibility for conducting and supporting basic, translational, and clinical research in the biomedical, behavioral, and social sciences related to child and maternal health, in medical rehabilitation, and in the reproductive sciences. Information specialists are available to answer your calls Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., EST.

Review Date: February 26, 2013

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Office of Disability Employment Policy

ODEP acts as a catalyst for job formation for people with disabilities through policy analysis and grants, outreach and education, technical assistance, and the promotion and development of best practices. The office works with other government agencies, the disability community, and employers, to coordinate policies and programs designed to increase employment opportunities for Americans with disabilities.

Review Date: November 21, 2008

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Office on Women's Health

The Office on Women's Health (OWH) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the government's champion and focal point for women's health issues. OWH works to redress inequities in research, health care services, and education that have historically placed the health of women at risk. The National Women's Health Information Center Helplines connect you with information and resources to answer your health questions. The helplines cannot provide a medical diagnosis or answer medical questions, but can help you learn more about a health condition. All medical questions should be directed to a doctor or nurse. Trained English- and Spanish-speaking information and referral specialists will provide organizational referrals to assist you with any health questions or find and order free health information for you. For breast feeding help, breastfeeding peer counselors can answer common breastfeeding questions and walk you through challenges on issues ranging from latching to pumping and storage.

Review Date: August 28, 2012

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President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities

The President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (PCPID), formerly The President's Committee on Mental Retardation, has served in an advisory capacity to the President and the Secretary of Health and Human Services on matters relating to persons with intellectual disabilities. PCPID has led the charge to improve the lives of people with intellectual disabilities and uphold their right to enjoy a quality of life that promotes independence, self-determination, and full participation as productive members of society. These goals include the assurance of full citizenship rights, the reduction of the occurrence and severity of intellectual disabilities and the promotion of forward thinking programs and services and cutting edge assistive technologies to improve the lives of people with intellectual disabilities.

Review Date: April 18, 2014

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Social Security Administration

The Social Security Administration provides public information materials about the Social Security and supplemental security income (SSI) programs, as well as information on /entitlement to Medicare. Inquiries concerning the Social Security and SSI programs can be directed to the Office of Communications. Inquiries about the Medicare program should be directed to Health Care Financing Administration, Office of Beneficiary Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244. At the local level, inquiries can be made to any Social Security office.

Review Date: August 21, 2008

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The Center for Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research

The purpose of the Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) is to make it easier to find, understand, and use the results of research that can make a positive impact on the lives of people with disabilities. In collaboration with several national and international partners, the Center on KTDRR carries out integrated training, dissemination, utilization, and technical assistance activities to (a.) increase use of valid and relevant evidence-based research findings that inform decision-making and (b.) increase the understanding and application of knowledge translation principles.

Review Date: February 27, 2013

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U.S. Department of Education

The U.S. Department of Education was created in 1980 by combining offices from several federal agencies. The Department's mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access. The Department of Education is dedicated to: 1) Establishing policies on federal financial aid for education, and distributing as well as monitoring those funds. 2) Collecting data on America's schools and disseminating research. 3) Focusing national attention on key educational issues. 4) Prohibiting discrimination and ensuring equal access to education.

Review Date: February 23, 2011

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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

The mission of this Federal agency is to help the nation's communities meet their development needs, spur economic growth in distressed neighborhoods, provide housing assistance for the poor, help rehabilitate and develop moderate and low-cost housing, and enforce the nation's fair housing laws. HUD plays a major role in supporting homeownership by underwriting homeownership for lower- and moderate-income families through its mortgage insurance program. To ensure easy access to its programs and services, HUD maintains eight clearinghouses with toll-free accessibility.

Review Date: June 13, 2011

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Wage and Hour Division, U.S. Department of Labor

The DOL Wage and Hour Division (WHD) is responsible for enforcing some of our nation’s most comprehensive federal labor laws on topics, including the minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, youth employment and special employment, family and medical leave, migrant workers, lie detector tests, worker protections in certain temporary worker programs, and the prevailing wages for government service and construction contracts.

Review Date: February 14, 2010

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Adaptive Technology Resource Centre

The ATRC is involved in research and development to find innovative solutions to accessibility challenges. We also provide training, consultation, and information to help both educators and users to effectively use adaptive technology. Adaptive technology describes the use of hardware and software to assist individuals who have difficulty accessing information systems using conventional methods. For example, mini keyboards can be used by people with a small range of hand movement, and screen readers can be used by people who are blind.

Review Date: February 20, 2009

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Alliance for Technology Access (ATA)

The Alliance for Technology Access (ATA) is a growing national network of technology resource centers, organizations, individuals, and companies. ATA encourages and facilitates the empowerment of people with disabilities to participate fully in their communities. ATA accomplishes this through public education, information and referral, capacity building in community organizations and advocacy/policy efforts. The mission of the ATA is to increase the use of technology by children and adults with disabilities and functional limitations.

Review Date: March 12, 2013

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Alliance National Parent Technical Assistance Center

The ALLIANCE National Parent Technical Assistance Center (NPTAC) provides Parent Centers, Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) and Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs), with innovative technical assistance, up-to-date information, and high quality resources and materials. A major goal of the ALLIANCE National PTAC is to build the capacity of Parent Centers in order to improve results for children with disabilities ages 0 -26 in rural, urban and suburban areas and from underrepresented and underserved populations. The ALLIANCE National PTAC, six Regional PTACs and the 106 Parent Centers are funded by the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP).

Review Date: September 26, 2011

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American Amputee Foundation, Inc

The American Amputee Foundation, Inc. (AAF) was established in 1975 as a national information clearinghouse and referral center serving amputees, their families, and care providers. The foundation researches and gathers information on amputation including studies, product information, available services, self-help publications, and hundreds of articles concerning amputation and related conditions. AAF has helped with insurance claims, justification letters to payers, indirect financial help with prosthetics, technical assistance in developing self-help programs, life care planning services, and just general questions about amputation.

Review Date: November 25, 2011

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American Association on Health and Disability

The American Association on Health and Disability (AAHD), a membership organization, is dedicated to the advancement of theory, knowledge and practice in the prevention of secondary disabling conditions and promotion of health and wellness for people with disabilities. AAHD’s mission is to support health promotion and wellness initiatives for people with disabilities at the federal, state and local level, reduce the incidence of secondary conditions in people with disabilities, as well as reduce health disparities between people with disabilities and the general population. AAHD achieves its mission through research, education, public awareness and advocacy.

Review Date: April 11, 2011

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American Council of the Blind

The American Council of the Blind (ACB) is composed primarily of blind persons involved in 50 active State and 20 professional and special-interest organizations. ACB strives to strengthen vocational and rehabilitation programs for the blind, and to ensure that blind people are treated favorably by federal programs, such as the Supplemental Security Income program. ACB provides information and consultation on legal problems, education and training of blind and visually impaired individuals, and public education about blindness. ACB also awards scholarships to blind college students and holds an annual national conference.

Review Date: January 16, 2009

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American Foundation for the Blind

The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) is a national nonprofit that expands possibilities for the more than 25 million people with vision loss in the U.S. AFB's priorities include broadening access to technology; elevating the quality of information and tools for the professionals who serve people with vision loss; and promoting independent and healthy living for people with vision loss by providing them and their families with relevant and timely resources. AFB's work in these areas is supported by its strong presence in Washington, DC, ensuring the rights and interests of Americans with vision loss are represented in our nation's public policies. AFB is based in New York, and maintains the Public Policy Center in Washington, DC; the AFB Center on Vision Loss in Dallas, TX; AFB TECH in Huntington, WV; and offices in Atlanta and San Francisco. AFB is also proud to house the Helen Keller Archives and honor the more than forty years that Helen Keller dedicated to working with AFB.

Review Date: March 24, 2011

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American Leprosy Missions

American Leprosy Missions (ALM), founded in 1906, is a nonprofit, Christian medical mission supporting more than 100 programs in approximately 20 countries. ALM provides anti-leprosy drugs, surgical intervention for disabilities, training of health workers, research, public information programs, and physical and vocational rehabilitation assistance. The Mission collaborates with member agencies of the International Federation of Anti-Leprosy Associations (ILEP) and Christian medical missions.

Review Date: January 02, 2009

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American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

The American Occupational Therapy Association is a national professional society established in 1917 to represent the interests and concerns of occupational therapy practitioners, and to improve the quality of occupational therapy services. Occupational therapy is a vital health care service whose practitioners help to restore and sustain the highest quality of productive life to persons recovering from illnesses or injuries, or coping with developmental disabilities or changes resulting from the aging process. Current AOTA membership numbers approximately 42,000, including occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants, and occupational therapy students. Members reside in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 65 foreign countries. AOTA's major programs and activities are directed toward assuring the quality of occupational services; improving consumer access to healthcare services, and promoting the professional development of members.

Review Date: February 14, 2013

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American Society for Deaf Children

The American Society for Deaf Children (ASDC) was founded in 1967 as a parent-helping-parent organization. Today, ASDC is a national, independent non-profit organization whose purpose is providing support, encouragement, and information to families raising children who are deaf or hard of hearing. ASDC supplies the information and support families request to ensure that their decisions and actions are based on up-to-date and accurate knowledge.

Review Date: January 02, 2009

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Amputee Coalition of America

The mission of the Amputee Coalition of America (ACA) is to reach out to people with limb loss and to empower them through education, support and advocacy. The ACA operates the National Limb Loss Information Center (NLLIC), the nation's most comprehensive source of information for people with limb differences.

Review Date: December 03, 2008

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Assistance Dogs International

This is a membership coalition representing organizations and individuals training and placing Assistance Dogs. The purpose of ADI is to improve the areas of training, placement, and utilization of Assistance Dogs. ADI's mission is to promote standards of excellence in all areas of Assistance Dog programs; facilitate communication and learning among member organizations; and educate the public to the benefits of these programs. Membership in the organization is extended to 501 (c)(3) organizations (or the equivalent as in the case of other countries), that train and place Assistance Dogs.

Review Date: August 27, 2008

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Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs

The Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs is a national resource, partner and advocate for state public health leaders and others working to improve the health of women, children, youth and families, including those with special health care needs. AMCHP's members directly serve women and children nationwide, and strive to improve the health of all women, infants, children and adolescents, including those with special health care needs, by administering critical public health education and screening services, and coordinating preventive, primary and specialty care. AMCHP's membership includes academic, advocacy and community based family health professionals, as well as families themselves.

Review Date: October 13, 2011

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Blind Childrens Center

The Blind Childrens Center is a nonprofit organization that was founded in 1938. The Center provides diversified services to meet the needs of blind and partially sighted children, ages birth through five, their parents, and siblings. Services include infant stimulation programs, preschool programs, psychological support services, multi-handicapped programs, and an information and referral service, which includes a toll-free number.

Review Date: January 08, 2009

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Braille Institute

The Braille Institute was founded in 1919 as the Universal Braille Press to provide services to the blind, which now includes production of more than 5 million Braille pages yearly, preschool services, supplemental academic programs for children, summer camps for children, a youth recreational center, low-priced consumer goods and visual aids, counseling, a career learning center, job placement, social activities, and instruction in basic living skills. Individualized programs developed for newly blind persons include training in orientation and mobility, Braille reading and writing, techniques of daily living, home management, and typing. The Institute's 1-800-BRAILLE line refers callers nationwide to organizations serving the blind in their areas as well as providing information on its services. Services are also provided for persons with low vision. The Institute's library circulates over 800,000 books (50,000 titles) in Braille as well as records and tapes. BIA has four satellite and 50 community centers in addition to its main facility. The Institute also conducts public information activities to increase public awareness of blindness and of the capabilities of blind persons. Direct services offered only in Southern California. No charge for services.

Review Date: January 15, 2009

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Brave Kids

Brave Kids has helped millions of children with chronic, life-threatening illnesses and disabilities since 1999. Brave Kids is the national non-profit organization that serves children with special needs by providing resources, emotional support and medical information. Brave Kids was founded by Kristen Fitzgerald after the loss of her two children to catastrophic illnesses. Its mission is to help children with chronic, life-threatening illnesses or disabilities, by connecting them to medical information and resources such as financial assistance, camps, support groups, dental assistance, child care and health services.

Review Date: May 19, 2011

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Canine Companions for Independence, Inc.

Founded in 1975, Canine Companions for Independence (CCI) is a non-profit organization that enhances the lives of people with disabilities by providing highly trained assistance dogs and ongoing support to ensure quality partnerships. CCI is recognized worldwide for the excellence of its dogs, and the quality and longevity of the matches it makes between dogs and people. The result is a life full of increased independence and loving companionship.

Review Date: April 01, 2009

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Center for Research on Women with Disabilities

The mission of the Center for Research on Women with Disabilities is to promote, develop, and disseminate information to improve the health and expand the life choices of women with disabilities. CROWD was established in 1993 in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Baylor College of Medicine, under the direction of Margaret A. Nosek, Ph.D. Its formation was inspired by the outpouring of support from women with disabilities around the nation in response to the announcement of the team's first federally-funded study of women's issues.

Review Date: February 02, 2012

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Chapel Hill Training - Outreach Project, Inc.

CHTOP was established in 1969 with funding from the Federal government as part of our nation's earliest attempts to provide educational services to young children with disabilities. Under the direction of Anne R. Sanford, who was the founder of CHTOP, the strategies and materials developed by CHTOP during these early years became known as the Chapel Hill Model. The Model included assessment instruments, curricula, and strategies for parent involvement and family-centered programming. In 1983, the Chapel Hill Model was validated unanimously for "exemplary program status" by the U.S. Department of Education's Joint Dissemination Review Panel (JDRP). Recently the Chapel Hill Model was renamed The LAP System. Our mission is to develop and demonstrate programs and strategies that will enhance the lives of children and families. Of principal concern to project staff are families in poverty, families caring for the elderly, children with disabilities or chronic illness, and children at risk of abuse and neglect.

Review Date: February 14, 2013

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Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD), is a national non-profit, tax-exempt (Section 501 (c) (3) ) organization providing education, advocacy and support for individuals with AD/HD. CHADD also publishes a variety of printed materials to keep members and professionals current on research advances, medications and treatments affecting individuals with AD/HD. These materials include Attention! magazine, News From CHADD, a free electronically mailed current events newsletter, as well as other publications of specific interest to educators, professionals and parents. CHADD's National Resource Center on AD/HD (NRC) serves as a national clearinghouse for the latest evidence-based information on AD/HD.

Review Date: August 26, 2011

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Choice Magazine Listening

Choice Magazine Listening (CML) provides bimonthly audio tapes of current magazine articles from over 100 magazines free of charge to the blind, visually impaired, dyslexic, or physically handicapped. Eight hours of articles, fiction, and poetry is recorded on special speed 4-track cassette format, playable on free Library of Congress playback equipment. CML is also available on the new digital Talking Book cartridges, playable on the free digital player from the Library of Congress.

Review Date: October 26, 2011

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Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation

The Reeve Foundation, formerly American Paralysis Association (APA) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to encourage and support research to cure paralysis caused by spinal cord injury and other central nervous system disorders. The Reeve Foundation is dedicated to curing spinal cord injury by funding innovative research, and improving the quality of life for people living with paralysis through grants, information and advocacy.

Review Date: April 14, 2011

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Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center

The Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center (PRC) promotes the health and well-being of people living with paralysis and their families by providing comprehensive information resources and referral services. The PRC is a program of the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation and is funded through a cooperative agreement with the CDC. Information specialists respond to questions in English and Spanish via a toll-free number:1-800-539-7309 (M-F, 9-5 EST).

Review Date: March 08, 2013

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Council of Citizens with Low Vision International

The Council of Citizens with Low Vision (CCLV) is an advocacy membership organization for partially sighted people. It aims to establish their right to make full use of their vision through the necessary aids, services, and technology; to educate the public and professionals about the needs and abilities of the partially sighted; to promote research and professional training; and to establish outreach programs to ensure that all partially sighted persons get the services they need. The Council is involved in obtaining Federal money for the purchase of vision aids and eliminating architectural barriers for the partially sighted. Membership is open to all persons with low vision and to their families.

Review Date: March 17, 2011

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Disabled American Veterans

The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) was chartered by Congress in 1932 as the official voice of the disabled veteran; it is not an agency of the Federal government, nor does it receive government funding. The DAV is a nonprofit association of 1,000,000 wartime disabled veterans, serving 2.5 million disabled veterans and their families. The DAV's national service program is rooted in 68 United States cities where 300 national service officers work to provide counseling, employment services, and assistance in gaining health care, free of charge to all disabled veterans. Many also visit towns and cities throughout the country in service vans. Perhaps its most important function is counseling veterans in completing the paperwork of applying for benefits from the Veterans Administration. All veterans and members of their families are eligible for the DAV's services. However, membership is limited to service-connected disabled veterans only.

Review Date: January 23, 2009

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Dogs for the Deaf, Inc.

Dogs for the Deaf, Inc. is a nonprofit organization that rescues and professionally trains dogs to assist people and enhance lives. The organization selects Hearing Dogs -- usually mixed breeds, small to medium in size, and 6 to 36 months of age -- from adoption shelters, trains them and places them with qualified individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Dogs are also trained and placed with children and families living with autism and people who are in need of emotional support or have other special needs. All dogs rescued are trained, placed and followed up on free of charge.

Review Date: June 01, 2011

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Easter Seals Inc.

Easter Seals has been helping individuals with disabilities and special needs, and their families, live better lives for nearly 90 years. From child development centers to physical rehabilitation and job training for people with disabilities, Easter Seals offers a variety of services to help people with disabilities address life's challenges and achieve personal goals. Easter Seals offers help, hope and answers to more than a million children and adults living with autism and other disabilities or special needs and their families each year. Services and support are provided through a network of more than 550 sites in the U.S. and through Ability First Australia. Each center provides exceptional services that are individualized, innovative, family-focused and tailored to meet specific needs of the particular community served. Easter Seals also advocates for the passage of legislation to help people with disabilities achieve independence, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Passed in 1990, the ADA prohibits discrimination against anyone who has a mental or physical disability, guaranteeing the civil rights of people with disabilities.

Review Date: May 31, 2011

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Family Village

Through its interactive web site, Family Village provides valuable information and resources for parents of individuals who have disabilities. Users can access information and resources on specific diagnoses, communication connections, adaptive products and technology, adaptive recreational activities, education, worship, health issues, disability-related media and literature, and more.

Review Date: February 09, 2012

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Family Voices

Family Voices aims to achieve family-centered care for all children and youth with special health care needs and/or disabilities. Through a national network, Family Voices provides families tools to make informed decisions, advocates for improved public and private policies, builds partnerships among professionals and families, and serves as a trusted resource on health care.

Review Date: September 28, 2011

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Federation for Children with Special Needs

The Federation for Children with Special Needs provides information, support, and assistance to parents of children with disabilities, their professional partners, and their communities. The Federation is committed to listening to and learning from families, and encouraging full participation in community life by all people, especially those with disabilities. The Federation promotes active and informed participation of parents of children with disabilities in shaping, implementing, and evaluating public policy that affects them. The Federation believes in the power of parents helping parents and has infused a proven model of peer support throughout all its work. Most Federation staff members are parents or family members of children with disabilities and people with disabilities.

Review Date: June 08, 2011

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Gallaudet University Library

The Gallaudet University Library is located in the Merrill Learning Center. The Library has approximately 210,000 print books, 320,000 electronic books, 8,000 videos, 70 databases, and 50,000 periodical subscriptions. All these collections are available for public use on campus. The Library has the largest collection of deaf-related materials in the world, including books, periodicals, videos and other types of media, and rare items in the University Archives. The Gallaudet University Library is a member of the Washington Research Library Consortium.

Review Date: February 26, 2013

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Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind, Inc.

The Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind provides trained dogs for qualified blind persons. The Foundation is a nonprofit organization incorporated under the Membership Corporation Laws of New York. It is supported entirely by voluntary contributions. There is no charge for its service, which includes a guide dog, four weeks of training in the dog's use and care, board and lodging while the student is in residence at the Foundation's training center, transportation costs within the continental U.S., and a follow up program. The Foundation aims to give blind persons better mobility, and to contribute to the rehabilitation progress of able citizens so that they can gain social integration and increased job opportunity for self-sufficiency.

Review Date: August 26, 2008

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Guiding Eyes for the Blind

Guiding Eyes is an internationally accredited, nonprofit guide dog school with a 50-plus year legacy of providing the blind and visually impaired with superior Guiding Eyes dogs, training, and lifetime support services. Guiding Eyes for the Blind is dedicated to enriching the lives of blind and visually impaired men and women by providing them with the freedom to travel safely, thereby assuring greater independence, dignity and new horizons of opportunity.

Review Date: January 13, 2012

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HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center

The HEATH Resource Center at The National Youth Transitions Center is an online clearinghouse on postsecondary education for individuals with disabilities. Managed by the George Washington University Graduate School of Education and Human Development, The HEATH Resource Center serves as the official resource website of the HSC Foundation’s National Youth Transitions Center, and gathers, develops and disseminates information in the form of resource papers, fact sheets, website directories, newsletters, and resource materials.

Review Date: May 24, 2011

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Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults

The mission of the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults (HKNC) is to enable all those who are deaf-blind to live and work the community of their choice. It provides comprehensive vocational rehabilitation training at its headquarters in New York and assistance with job and residential placements when training is completed. Services in the field include 10 regional offices, over 40 affiliated agencies, a National Training Team and an Older Adult Program. HKNC is a partner in the National Technical Assistance Consortium for Children and Young Adults Who are Deaf-Blind and with DB-LINK, a clearinghouse for information on deaf-blindness. HKNC also maintains a national registry of individuals who are deaf-blind.

Review Date: May 31, 2011

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International Association of Assistance Dog Partners

The International Association of Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP) is a cross disability group which educates and supports people with disabilities who have canine assistants do such things as guide people with visual disabilities, alert people with hearing disabilities to sounds in their environment, and service dogs that facilitate people with all other sorts of disabilities. The mission of this non profit organization is to (1) provide assistance dog partners with a voice in the assistance dog field; (2) enable those partnered with guide dogs, hearing dogs and service dogs to work together on issues of mutual concern; (3) to foster the disabled person / assistance dog partnership. The organization is run by a Board whose members are drawn from the population of disabled people partnered with guide dogs, hearing dogs and service dogs.

Review Date: June 07, 2011

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International Rett Syndrome Foundation

As the most comprehensive worldwide organization dedicated to Rett syndrome, the International Rett Syndrome Foundation proudly continues fulfilling its core mission to fund research for treatments and a cure for Rett syndrome while enhancing the overall quality of life for those living with Rett syndrome by providing information, programs and services. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neuro-developmental disorder that occurs mostly in females. It’s usually caused by a mutation of the MECP2 gene on the x chromosome. Rett syndrome is found in all racial and ethnic groups throughout the world, and in every socioeconomic class. RTT affects 1 in 10,000-15,000 live female births. Early developmental milestones appear normal; between 6-18 months of age, there is a regression, affecting speech, hand skills and coordination. A hallmark of RTT is repetitive hand movements that may become almost constant while awake. Other features may include seizures, irregular breathing, difficulties swallowing and curvature of the spine. Many individuals with Rett syndrome live well into adulthood. In October of 1999, the discovery of genetic mutations in the gene MECP2 on the X chromosome (Xq28) revealed significant insight into the cause of Rett syndrome. This gene encodes an abundant chromosomal protein (MeCP2), which acts as a transcriptional repressor by binding to methylated CpG base pairs throughout the genome and silencing other genes. Rett syndrome is thought to arise in great part due to abnormal over-expression of genes improperly regulated by a defective MeCP2. This is the first instance of a human disease caused by defects in a protein whose function is to silence other genes. There is currently no cure. Continued research is now focused on still unidentified genetic factors which may contribute to Rett syndrome. Numerous target genes have been identified that are regulated by the MeCP2 protein. Genetic studies have begun to identify additional causative genes such as CDKL5 and FOXG1. Valuable animal models have been developed that effectively reproduce the disease and demonstrate the potential reversibility of the disease. Neurobiological studies have enabled us to determine some of the neurological underpinnings of Rett Syndrome pathogenesis.

Review Date: February 05, 2009

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International Ventilator Users Network

The mission of Post-Polio Health International, including International Ventilators Users Network is to enhance the lives and independence of polio survivors and home mechanical ventilator users by promoting education, networking, and advocacy among these individuals and healthcare providers. IVUN is a forum for ventilator users, their families, pulmonologists, pediatricians, respiratory therapists, ventilator manufacturers, and vendors to discuss unique problems of home ventilation and to cooperatively seek solutions.

Review Date: May 25, 2011

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Little People of America, Inc.

Little People of America, Inc. will provide support and information to people of short stature, (dwarfism), and their families. Primary membership usually is offered to those people who are around 4’10” in height as an adult. LPA is a non-profit, member run organization founded in 1957. LPA will assist those who have a diagnosis of dwarfism with their physical and developmental concerns resulting from short stature. LPA offers information on employment, education, disability rights, adoption of short statured children, medical issues, clothing, adaptive devices and parenting tips. Information is provided through hundreds of dedicated volunteers throughout the U.S. as well as through a national newsletter “LPA Today,” chapter, and district newsletters. LPA also provides opportunities for social interaction at chapter, district, regional meetings, national conferences, and participation in athletic events. LPA, Inc. provides educational scholarships, medical assistance grants, access to our medical advisory board, and funds for publications and other projects.

Review Date: January 12, 2011

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Medicare Rights Center

The Medicare Rights Center is a national, nonprofit consumer service organization that works to ensure access to affordable health care for older adults and people with disabilities through counseling and advocacy, educational programs and public policy initiatives. Since 1989, MRC has helped people with Medicare understand their rights and benefits, navigate the Medicare system and secure the quality care they deserve.

Review Date: April 21, 2011

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Mobility Unlimited, Inc.

Mobility Unlimited began operations in June 2000 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Their goal is to improve the quality of life of physically disabled individuals in all communities by helping them gain greater mobility and independence.

Review Date: December 11, 2008

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MUMS National Parent-to-Parent Network, Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc.

MUMS is a national Parent-to-Parent organization for parents or care providers of a child with any disability, rare disorder, chromosomal abnormality or health condition. MUMS' mission to provide support to parents in the form of a networking system that matches them with other parents whose children have the same or similar condition. Through a database of over 19,000 families from 54 countries, covering over 3200 disorders, very rare syndromes or undiagnosed conditions can be matched. Parents can then exchange valuable medical information, as well as, the names of doctors, clinics and medical resources or research programs. Families provide each other with emotional support; they don't feel so alone when they have each other to reach out to in time of need. MUMS networks with other organizations that do matching, thus expanding the possibilities of finding a match. MUMS also connects parents with support groups dealing with their child's specific disability or assists them in forming a group.

Review Date: December 11, 2008

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National Amputation Foundation

The National Amputation Foundation.....(1st sentence correct as is). Services include peer phone calls or visits when possible, information, resources and support. There is a donated durable medical equipment give-a-way program open to anyone in need. Items must be picked up at the office. NAF also has a scholarship program for students with major limb amputations attending full time.

Review Date: November 24, 2008

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National Association of Area Agencies on Aging

The National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (N4A) is a private, nonprofit organization that represents the interests of approximately 629 Area Agencies on Aging and more than 18,000 title VI native American aging programs across the nation in dealing with the Congress, the Administration, and other national organizations. It provides leadership to the member Area Agencies by providing technical assistance, materials, information, and training. It encourages cooperation between the public and private sectors in serving the elderly. It serves as a clearinghouse for the exchange of information on programs, legislation, and resources in the private sector.

Review Date: September 29, 2009

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National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability

The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) is a public health practice and resource center on health promotion for persons with disabilities. They provide disability specific information regarding physical activity, nutrition, and lifestyle weight management along with web-based health promotion programs inclusive to users of all abilities. NCHPAD's website features a database of programs, organizations, parks, and personal trainers all equipped to provide physical activity and health services to persons with disabilities.

Review Date: March 08, 2013

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National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

NECTAC is the national early childhood technical assistance center supported by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) under the provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). NECTAC serves Part C-Infant and Toddlers with Disabilities Programs and Part B-Section 619 Preschool Programs for Children with Disabilities in all 50 states and 10 jurisdictions to improve service systems and outcomes for children and families. NECTAC also provides comprehensive topical information related to the Part C Early Intervention Programs and Preschool Special Education programs, as well as state contacts for these programs and other early childhood programs. Finally, NECTAC publishes an electronic newsletter, eNotes, that is available free to subscribers.

Review Date: October 18, 2011

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National Education for Assistance Dog Services, Inc.

National Education for Assistance Dog Services, Inc. is a nonprofit organization which provides trained guide dogs to people who are deaf and physically disabled, so they may live more independent lives. Established in 1976, the program has place dogs primarily in the New England-Mid-Atlantic states. Hearing dogs are trained to respond to sounds (i.e. doorbell, telephone, smoke alarm, etc.) and lead the person to the sound, while service dogs are able to pick up anything that is dropped, pull wheelchairs, turn on light switches and carry items. Service Dogs for the classroom are trained to assist special educators and therapists who work with physically, mentally, or emotionally disabled children.

Review Date: October 17, 2010

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National Federation of the Blind

The National Federation of the Blind (NFB), established in 1940 as an organization of blind persons, serves as both an advocacy and a public information vehicle. NFB contacts newly blind persons to help them with adjustment problems, provides information on services available from governmental and private agencies and on applicable laws and regulations, provides scholarships, and assists blind persons who are the victims of discrimination or whose rights have been denied. NFB monitors legislation for blind persons and evaluates and promotes new technology useful to the blind. NFB prepares pamphlets and uses public appearances to educate the public to the fact that the blind are normal individuals who can compete on terms of equality with others.

Review Date: November 24, 2008

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National Institute for Rehabilitation Engineering

The National Institute for Rehabilitation Engineering (NIRE), formed in 1967, provides custom-made devices, training, and onsite services for severely and multiply handicapped individuals. The purpose of the N.I.R.E. is to use today's technology to help people with disabilities to be more independent and self-sufficient in their everyday lives. The Institute is an onsite technology training organization and research and development facility, and designs custom-made devices for handicapped persons who are trial-fitted, trained, counseled, and evaluated in the field. NIRE's outreach programs provide most of their services and aids locally in schools, clinics, homes, and places of employment. The N.I.R.E. assists people of all ages with all types of disabilities. Services are offered with a sliding fee scale, and nobody is denied service based on inability to pay.

Review Date: November 24, 2008

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National Lekotek Center

The National Lekotek Center is a non-profit 501(C)3 organization based in Chicago, Illinois, and is the administrative and training center for a nationwide network of Lekotek centers housing family play facilities, toy lending libraries and computer play resources. Clinical evidence affirms that early intervention using strategic play techniques profoundly affects a child's learning capacity. Lekotek uses interactive play experiences, and the learning that results, to promote the inclusion of children with special needs into family and community life.

Review Date: November 15, 2011

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National Limb Loss Information Center

The mission of the Amputee Coalition is to reach out to and empower people affected by limb loss to achieve their full potential through education, support and advocacy, and to promote limb loss prevention. The Amputee Coalition Programs include advocacy, support and education. Advocacy: Amputee Coalition advocates for the rights of people with limb loss. This includes access to, and delivery of, information, quality care, appropriate devices, reimbursement, and the services required to lead empowered lives. Amputee Coalition promotes full implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and other legislation which guarantees full participation in society for all people, regardless of disability. Amputee Coalition sensitizes professionals, the general public and policy makers to the issues, needs and concerns of amputees. Support: Amputee Coalition publishes inMotion, a magazine that comprehensively addresses areas of interest and concern to amputees and those who care for and about them. The Amputee Coalition toll-free hotline provides answers and resources for people who have experienced the loss of a limb and those involved with their lives. Education:Amputee Coalition develops and distributes educational resources, booklets, video tapes, and fact sheets to enhance the knowledge and coping skills of people affected by amputation or congenital limb differences.Amputee Coalition acts as a source of comprehensive information regarding amputation and rehabilitation through its National Limb Loss Information Center. Amputee Coalition provides technical help, resources and training for local amputee educational and support organizations Amputee Coalition conducts programs for its members, professionals, and the general public to educate them regarding the physical, emotional, technological, and other issues involving amputees.

Review Date: May 24, 2012

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National MPS Society

The National MPS Society exists to find cures for MPS and related diseases. We provide hope and support for affected individuals and their families through research, advocacy and awareness of these devastating diseases.

Review Date: December 27, 2010

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National Recreation and Park Association

The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), founded in 1965 by the merger of seven organizations, promotes the interests of the park and recreation movement through public information, political advocacy, research, and professional development. Through its divisions and programs, the NRPA strives to build public awareness of the role of physical fitness in health, encourages recreation among the elderly, and promotes standards for recreation services for the handicapped. The NRPA's National Therapeutic Recreation Society is working to improve professional qualifications and standards. Other NRPA services include accreditation of colleges/universities, advocacy, continuing education programs, meetings and conferences, a library on park and recreation interests, an information clearinghouse, and answers to technical questions.

Review Date: June 26, 2008

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National Rehabilitation Association

National Rehabilitation Association (NRA) was founded in 1925 to promote the vocational rehabilitation of persons with disabilities through advocacy, professional development, and public education. State and federal legislation designed to meet the needs of persons with disabilities is promoted. Conferences, meetings, continuing education, and seminars are sponsored to improve treatment and rehabilitation methods. Membership also includes publications and participation in a special interest division dealing with job placement, independent living, counseling, vocational adjustment, rehabilitation instruction, administration, private sector rehabilitation, multicultural interests, or other topics of concern to members.

Review Date: November 25, 2008

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National Resource Center on Supportive Housing and Home Modification

The main purpose of the National Resource Center on Supportive Housing and Home Modification is to: promote aging in place; help states, communities, the private sector and service providers improve supportive housing and home modification; maximize single family and multi-unit housing as a long-term care resource; equip families and individuals with the knowledge to plan for their housing, health and supportive service needs; and increase accessible and supportive housing that promotes healthy, independent living.

Review Date: December 22, 2010

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National Senior Citizens Law Center

The National Senior Citizens Law Center is a non-profit organization whose principal mission is to protect the rights of low-income older adults. Through advocacy, litigation, and the education and counseling of local advocates, they seek to ensure the health and economic security of those with limited income and resources, and access to the courts for all. Since 1972, the National Senior Citizens Law Center has worked to promote the independence and well-being of low-income elderly and persons with disabilities, especially women, people of color, and other disadvantaged minorities. They work to preserve and strengthen Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security and SSI, benefits programs that allow low-income older adults to live with dignity and independence. In addition, they work for greater access to the federal courts for all.

Review Date: December 22, 2010

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National Spinal Cord Injury Association

The National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA) Resource Center provides information and resources to meet the needs of over one million individuals who have spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D); their families and friends; the medical and scientific community; service and business professionals; the media; students; government; elected officials; and the public. Staffed by Information Specialists (including specialists with spinal cord injuries and a spinal cord injury nurse), the Resource Center provides access via our toll free Help Line (800-962-9629) and via email to the most current community living and medical information.

Review Date: October 21, 2011

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National Therapeutic Recreation Society

The National Therapeutic Recreation Society, a branch of the National Recreation and Park Association, is a membership organization with the belief that leisure and recreation should be available to all people, especially those with disabilities or limiting conditions. Services are delivered through a continuum of care--therapy, leisure education and recreation participation--in order to enable and empower people to develop and maintain health, well-being, and appropriate leisure lifestyles.

Review Date: August 25, 2008

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Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (FHEO)

The mission of the Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (FHEO) is to create equal housing opportunities for all persons living in America by administering laws that prohibit discrimination in housing on the basis of race,color, religion, gender, national origin, age, disability, and familial status. FHEO administers federal laws and establishes national policies that make sure all Americans have equal access to the housing of their choice.

Review Date: October 28, 2009

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Office on Disability, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Secretary of Health and Human Services created the Office on Disability (OD) in November 2002. Approximately 54 million individuals of all ages, races, ethnicities, socioeconomic status and educational attainment in the United States live with at least one disability. The mission of OD is to oversee the implementation and coordination of programs and policies that enhance the health and well being of people with disabilities. OD works directly with the agencies of the Department to facilitate policy development and to advance disability issues across agency and Departmental lines. Within its new mission, OD identifies opportunities to maximize and streamline processes that result in the elimination of inefficient or redundant efforts to serve Americans with disabilities. OD provides strategic technical advice to the Secretary of Health and Human Services in support of Departmental components as they address matters related to disability. This is done through the use of newly established or existing Departmental structures and processes. Efforts to fulfill OD’s mission are organized around three themes: 1. Improve Access to Community Living Services and Supports 2. Integrate Health Services and Social Supports 3. Provide Strategic Support on Disability Matters

Review Date: April 07, 2011

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PACER Center, Inc.

PACER Center is a parent training and information center for families of children and youth with all disabilities from birth through 21 years old. Located in Minneapolis, it serves families across the nation, as well as those in Minnesota. Parents can find publications, workshops, and other resources to help make decisions about education, vocational training, employment, and other services for their children with disabilities. PACER Center is a 501(C)(3) nonprofit organization.

Review Date: October 26, 2010

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Paralyzed Veterans of America

Paralyzed Veterans of America was founded following World War II to meet the needs of veterans who were paralyzed as a result of disease or injury to the spinal cord. Paralyzed Veterans is supported by donations from the general public. It works to ensure quality health care, rehabilitation, and full civil rights for veterans with spinal cord injuries or diseases, and all persons with a disability. Paralyzed Veterans supports legislation and advances in medicine and technology through various programs, departments and foundations such as: PVA Research Foundation; PVA Education Foundation; National Advocacy Program; National Legislation Program; National Veterans Benefits Program; and PVA National Sports and Recreation Program.

Review Date: November 02, 2011

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Pet Partners®

Pet Partners®, formerly Delta Society®, was established in 1977. The mission of the organization is to improve human health through therapy, service and companion animals. Pet Partners provides INFORMATION about service dogs and a directory of service dog trainers on their website; they do not train or place service dogs. Pet Partners also provides training for HANDLERS, evaluation and registration for people/animal teams who want to provide animal-assisted activities/therapy in their communities through their Therapy Animal Program. Pet Partners provides information about research done on the health benefits of pets and animal-assisted therapy on their website.

Review Date: August 30, 2012

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Pilot Dogs, Inc.

Pilot Dogs is a nonprofit organization founded in 1950 to train guide dogs and to teach blind persons to work with them. Dogs are trained individually for 3 to 4 months, then trained for another 4 weeks to work with their masters. Pilot Dogs operates a breeding program of German Shepherds, Doberman Pinschers, Golden Retrievers, Standard Poodles, Boxers, and Labrador Retrievers and raises them in private homes until they are ready for training. Pilot Dogs is supported entirely by charitable 501(c) 3 contributions; there is no charge for its services.

Review Date: December 16, 2008

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Post-Polio Health International

The mission of Post-Polio Health International, including International Ventilator Users Network, is to enhance the lives and independence of polio survivors and home mechanical ventilator users by promoting education, networking, and advocacy among these individuals and healthcare providers. Audiences addressed include consumers, professionals, survivors of polio, rehabilitation health professionals, neurologists and pulmonologists. Requests for information may be received by telephone, mail, e-mail and in person.

Review Date: February 26, 2013

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Prevent Blindness America

Prevent Blindness America, formerly known as the National Society to Prevent Blindness (NSPB), was founded in 1908. It promotes the prevention of blindness through a comprehensive program of community services, public and professional education, and research. Prevent Blindness attempts to translate medical and technological advances in the field of eye care into practical and obtainable services for the public. It sponsors vision screening and educational projects for the detection of vision problems in young children and adults. Speakers and educational materials are geared to such specific audiences as elementary school children, senior citizens, nurses, and agricultural workers. Information and advisory services related to current treatments and available facilities, research findings, and medical knowledge in the field of eye care and eye disease, and eye health and eye safety are available upon request by phone or letter. Prevent Blindess' program of professional education provides health professionals and health service groups with eye-care resource materials and educational programs related to services in the community. The group conducts statistical studies on the causes of blindness and funds laboratory and clinical research projects related to the prevention of blindness. There are affiliates and divisions in 23 States.

Review Date: February 04, 2011

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Special Olympics

Special Olympics, created in 1968 by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, is a global movement dedicated to empowering individuals with intellectual disabilities to become physically fit, productive and respected members of society through sports training and competition. Special Olympics offers more than 1.3 million children and adults with intellectual disabilities year-round training and competition in 26 Olympic-type summer and winter sports. In addition to its sports programming, Special Olympics offers related initiatives, such as Healthy Athletes®, which provides a variety of health services through clinics conducted in welcoming environments at Special Olympics competitions. There is no charge to participate in Special Olympics.

Review Date: June 10, 2010

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Spina Bifida Association of America

The mission of the Spina Bifida Association of America is to promote the prevention of spina bifida and to enhance the lives of all affected. The Association was founded in 1973 to address the specific needs of the spina bifida community and serves as the national representative of almost 60 chapters. SBAA's efforts benefit thousands of infants, children, adults, parents and professionals each year.

Review Date: May 13, 2010

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Spinal Cord Injury Information Network

The SPINALCORD Injury Information Network offers educational and research information relevant to persons with spinal cord injuries, their families, and others of interest. Within this site, there is original information managed by the UAB Model SCI System along with the links to web sites around the world that contain SCI educational and research information along with the general disability related information.

Review Date: July 28, 2010

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Spinal Cord Society

Founded in 1978, the Spinal Cord Society remains pure to its goal of achieving a practical cure for chronic spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Society is a non-profit 501 C-3, grassroots organization linked by over 200 volunteer chapters. A monthly newsletter, spanning North America and 24 other countries, links thousands of our members, consisting of the spinal cord injured, thier families and friends.

Review Date: August 05, 2010

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TASH: Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion for People with Disabilities

TASH is an international grassroots leader in advancing inclusive communities through research, education and advocacy. Founded in 1975 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, TASH advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with the most significant disabilities and support needs-those most vulnerable to segregation, abuse, neglect and institutionalization. The inclusive practices they validate through research have been shown to improve outcomes for all people.

Review Date: January 16, 2009

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The Arc

Arc is the largest national community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Arc encompasses all ages and all spectrums from autism, Down syndrome, Fragile X and various other developmental disabilities. With more than 140,000 members and more than 700 state and local chapters nationwide, Arc works to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families have the support they need to be members of the community.

Review Date: December 20, 2011

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ThinkFirst National Injury Prevention Foundation

The ThinkFirst National Injury Prevention Foundation’s mission is to prevent brain, spinal cord and other traumatic injuries through education, research and advocacy. The ThinkFirst Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, providing program materials, training and support to more than 175 ThinkFirst chapters worldwide, that provide dynamic presentations to students of all ages. Health educators and ThinkFirst VIP speakers, who share their personal testimony of experiencing a brain or spinal cord injury, increase participants’ knowledge as to how injuries occur and how important it is to make safe choices pertaining to vehicle safety, sports safety, and the prevention of falls and violence. Visit www.thinkfirst.org for Facts and Prevention Tips.

Review Date: March 20, 2013

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