U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Menu

Natural Disasters

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting public health activities in the United States. CDC's Mission is to collaborate to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health – through health promotion, prevention of disease, injury and disability, and preparedness for new health threats. CDC is composed of the Office of the Director, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Center for Global Health, and five Offices, including Public Health Preparedness and Response; State and Local Support; Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services; Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health; and Infectious Diseases. CDC employs more than 15,000 employees in more than 50 countries and in 168 occupational categories.

Review Date: February 27, 2013

List reviewed web resources

Federal Emergency Management Agency

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) works to reduce risk, strengthen support systems and help people and their communities prepare for and cope with disasters regardless of the cause. FEMA is an independent federal agency with more than 2,600 full time employees. FEMA also has nearly 4,000 standby disaster assistance employees who are available to help out after disasters. Often FEMA works in partnership with other organizations that are part of the nation's emergency management system. These partners include state and local emergency management agencies, 27 federal agencies and the American Red Cross. FEMA's role include advising on building codes and flood plain management; teaching people how to get through a disaster; helping to equip local and state emergency preparedness; coordinating the federal response to a disaster; making disaster assistance available to states, communities, businesses and individuals; training emergency managers; supporting the nation's fire service; and administering the national flood and crime insurance programs.

Review Date: August 26, 2008

List reviewed web resources

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) aims to detect, prevent, and control infectious diseases from spreading, whether they are naturally occurring, unintentional, or the result of terrorism. With a focus on diseases that have been around for many years, emerging diseases (those that are new or just recently identified), and zoonotic diseases (those spread from animals to people), NCEZID's work recognizes the vital interconnectedness of microbes and the environment, and involves many scientific disciplines to attain better health for humans and animals and improve our environment. Each of the center’s seven divisions works with partners to protect and improve the public’s health in the United States and worldwide.

Review Date: July 18, 2011

List reviewed web resources

National Center for Environmental Health - NCEH
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDC's National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) plans, directs, and coordinates a national program to maintain and improve the health of the American people by promoting a healthy environment and by preventing premature death and avoidable illness and disability caused by non-infectious, non-occupational environmental and related factors. NCEH is committed to safeguarding the health of populations that are particularly vulnerable to certain environmental hazards - children, the elderly, and people with disabilities.

Review Date: August 09, 2011

List reviewed web resources

National Hurricane Center, National Weather Service

The National Hurricane Center's mission is to save lives, mitigate property loss, and improve economic efficiency by issuing the best watches, warnings, forecasts and analyses of hazardous tropical weather, and by increasing understanding of these hazards.

Review Date: August 26, 2008

List reviewed web resources

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (formerly the Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness) was created under the Pandemic and All Hazards Preparedness Act in the wake of Katrina to lead the nation in preventing, preparing for, and responding to the adverse health effects of public health emergencies and disasters. ASPR focuses on preparedness planning and response; building federal emergency medical operational capabilities; countermeasures research, advance development, and procurement; and grants to strengthen the capabilities of hospitals and health care systems in public health emergencies and medical disasters. The office provides federal support, including medical professionals through ASPR’s National Disaster Medical System, to augment state and local capabilities during an emergency or disaster.

Review Date: August 24, 2011

List reviewed web resources

U.S. Department of Labor

The Department of Labor fosters and promotes the welfare of the job seekers, wage earners, and retirees of the United States by improving their working conditions, advancing their opportunities for profitable employment, protecting their retirement and health care benefits, helping employers find workers, strengthening free collective bargaining, and tracking changes in employment, prices, and other national economic measurements. In carrying out this mission, the Department administers a variety of Federal labor laws including those that guarantee workers’ rights to safe and healthful working conditions; a minimum hourly wage and overtime pay; freedom from employment discrimination; unemployment insurance; and other income support.

Review Date: September 14, 2010

List reviewed web resources

Army Corps of Engineers

The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is made up of approximately 34,600 civilian engineers, scientists and other specialists and 650 military members who work hand in hand as leaders in engineering and environmental matters. A vital part of United States Army, USACE responds to natural disasters and other emergencies such as floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, bombings, and hazardous material spills. The Corps uses its engineering expertise for inspecting and assessing damage, cleaning up debris, making repairs, and returning power and water supplies to disaster areas.

Review Date: May 04, 2009

List reviewed web resources

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Since its inception in 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has accomplished many great scientific and technological feats in air and space. NASA's mission is to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research.

Review Date: September 06, 2010

List reviewed web resources

U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life.

Review Date: September 09, 2010

List reviewed web resources