U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Menu

Natural Disasters

Prepare for an Emergency

There is no way to know when the next disaster will strike. Make sure your family is prepared. Planning ahead can help keep you and your loved ones safe.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Safe and Well List

If you have been affected by a disaster, post a "safe and well message" that your loved ones can view, or search for loved ones who have registered.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

American Red Cross, National Headquarters

Be Informed: What to Do Before, During and After an Emergency

Prepare, plan and stay informed! Taking these simple steps can make a big difference in ensuring your safety and well-being and that of your loved ones. Learn how to prepare for and respond to emergencies, including natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks.

Review Date: March 13, 2013

Department of Homeland Security

Ready.gov: Floods

Flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Be prepared for flooding no matter where you live, especially if you are in a low-lying area, near water or downstream from a dam.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Ready.gov: Hurricanes

Hurricanes are severe tropical storms that form in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and in the eastern Pacific Ocean. If you live in a coastal community, learn what to do if you are told to evacuate.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

Department of Homeland Security

Being Prepared for an Earthquake

Surviving an earthquake and reducing its health impact requires preparation, planning, and practice. Learning what actions to take can help you and your family to remain safe and healthy in the event of an earthquake.

Review Date: May 28, 2014

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Natural Hazards Gateway

Learn about the seven natural hazards facing the Nation — earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, landslides, tsunamis, volcanoes, and wildfires — and how USGS science helps mitigate disasters and build resilient communities.

Review Date: December 07, 2012

U.S. Geological Survey

DisasterAssistance.gov

Locate and apply for disaster relief offered by U.S. Government agencies which sponsor more than 50 forms of disaster assistance.

Review Date: February 13, 2013

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Earthquake Information for Individuals and Families

Learn what to do in an earthquake and how to help make your family, your home, and your community more resistant to the potentially dangerous and damaging effects of earthquakes.

Review Date: October 30, 2014

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Emergency Preparedness and Response

This CDC site is intended to increase the nation's ability to prepare for and respond to public health emergencies. Topics covered include bioterrorism, chemical and radiation emergencies, mass casualties, severe weather and natural disasters, and recent disease outbreaks.

Review Date: March 13, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Fact Sheet on Natural Disaster Recovery: Cleanup Hazard

Cleanup work of any kind is hazardous, but flood conditions make it even more so. Following the procedures listed on this page will help to keep you safe while cleaning up after natural disasters that involve flooding.

Review Date: October 30, 2014

U.S. Department of Labor

Flooding: Response and Recovery

This page lists general information to help people in flooded areas recover and reduce risks caused by a flood.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

FloodSmart.gov: National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Learn how to prepare for and recover from a flood, file an insurance claim, and find answers to frequently asked questions about flood and hurricane preparedness.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Hurricanes - Prepare Before the Storm

Learn how to prepare before the storm. Get supplies, make a plan, and learn about hurricane recovery to increase your safety during a storm.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Key Facts About Flood Readiness

This document offers information on how to be prepared for a flood, the emergency supplies you will need, and what to do if you do or do not need to evacuate.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

National Center for Environmental Health - NCEH
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Personal Hygiene and Handwashing After a Disaster or Emergency

Keeping hands clean during an emergency helps prevent the spread of germs. Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected. However, when water is not available, alcohol-based hand products (sanitizers) made for cleaning hands can be used.

Review Date: March 24, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Plan and Prepare for Many Types of Emergencies

Find tips on how to prepare for many types of emergencies including: power outages, winter storms, heat waves, floods, earthquakes, fires, tornadoes, chemical emergencies, acts of terrorism, and more.

Review Date: December 10, 2012

American Red Cross, National Headquarters

Prevent Illness After a Natural Disaster

This fact sheet discusses how to prevent illness after a natural disaster. Suggestions include preventing carbon monoxide poisoning, cleaning up safely after floods, keeping food and drinking water safe, washing hands, and avoiding mosquitoes.

Review Date: March 24, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Prevent Injury After a Natural Disaster

During a natural disaster and its aftermath, there are some basic facts to remember that will help protect one’s personal safety. Suggestions include: using chain saws safely, avoiding electrical hazards, being aware of dangerous materials, and being alert to gas leaks.

Review Date: December 19, 2012

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Preventing Violence After a Natural Disaster

The increased stress associated with family disruption, challenges in meeting daily needs, as well as disruptions in law enforcement services can increase the possibility of violence. Follow these tips to prevent child abuse, manage stress and more.

Review Date: January 23, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

PublicHealthEmergency.gov

This site acts as a portal for residents in the U.S. and worldwide to obtain information from all U.S. federal agencies involved in a public health emergency, a medical disaster or the public health aspects of a natural or man-made disaster.

Review Date: March 11, 2013

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Ready Kids - Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Ready Kids offers instructions on what kids and their families can do to be better prepared for emergenices.

Review Date: February 04, 2013

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Returning Home After a Disaster: Be Healthy and Safe

Find tips for staying safe when returning home after a disaster, such as a flood or earthquake.

Review Date: December 19, 2012

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event: What to Expect

This fact sheet offers self-help tips for coping with the aftermath of trauma. It discusses the long-term impact of trauma, including personal uncertainties, family relationship changes, work disruptions, and financial concerns.

Review Date: March 27, 2013

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - SAMHSA
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tornadoes

Knowing what to do when you see a tornado, or when you hear a tornado warning, can help protect you and your family. Although nothing can be done to prevent tornadoes, there are actions you can take for your health and safety.

Review Date: December 19, 2012

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services