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Lead Poisoning

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Information Center, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ATSDR serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. ATSDR is directed by congressional mandate to perform specific functions concerning the effect on public health of hazardous substances in the environment. These functions include public health assessments of waste sites, health consultations concerning specific hazardous substances, health surveillance and registries, response to emergency releases of hazardous substances, applied research in support of public health assessments, information development and dissemination, and education and training concerning hazardous substances.

Review Date: June 22, 2011

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting public health activities in the United States. CDC's Mission is to collaborate to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health – through health promotion, prevention of disease, injury and disability, and preparedness for new health threats. CDC is composed of the Office of the Director, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Center for Global Health, and five Offices, including Public Health Preparedness and Response; State and Local Support; Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services; Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health; and Infectious Diseases. CDC employs more than 15,000 employees in more than 50 countries and in 168 occupational categories.

Review Date: February 27, 2013

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National Center for Environmental Health - NCEH
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDC's National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) plans, directs, and coordinates a national program to maintain and improve the health of the American people by promoting a healthy environment and by preventing premature death and avoidable illness and disability caused by non-infectious, non-occupational environmental and related factors. NCEH is committed to safeguarding the health of populations that are particularly vulnerable to certain environmental hazards - children, the elderly, and people with disabilities.

Review Date: August 09, 2011

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National Lead Information Center

The National Lead Information Center (NLIC) provides the general public and professionals with information about lead hazards and their prevention. NLIC operates under a contract with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with funding from EPA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The public may contact the Center Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm EST

Review Date: April 18, 2014

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Office of Pesticide Programs, OCSPP, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The mission of EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) is to protect public health and the environment from the risks posed by pesticides and to promote safer means of pest control.

Review Date: April 04, 2011

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The mission of the EPA is to protect human health and to safeguard the natural environment--air, water, and land--upon which life depends. Through the work of its many projects and programs the EPA's purpose is to ensure that: all Americans are protected from significant risks to human health and the environment where they live, learn and work; national efforts to reduce environmental risk are based on the best available scientific information; federal laws protecting human health and the environment are enforced fairly and effectively; environmental protection is an integral consideration in U.S. policies concerning natural resources, human health, economic growth, energy, transportation, agriculture, industry, and international trade, and these factors are similarly considered in establishing environmental policy; all parts of society--communities, individuals, business, state and local governments, tribal governments--have access to accurate information sufficient to effectively participate in managing human health and environmental risks; environmental protection contributes to making our communities and ecosystems diverse, sustainable and economically productive; the United States plays a leadership role in working with other nations to protect the global environment.

Review Date: December 28, 2010

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Water Quality Association

The Water Quality Association (WQA), an association for the point-of-use water treatment industry, promotes the advancement of the industry. The WQA holds meetings to facilitate the exchange of information, offers training programs, develops voluntary product standards, administers product and dealer certification programs, conducts research, publishes water treatment information, provides technical assistance to government and other organizations, and conducts symposia and seminars. Other services include conventions, trade shows, public relations, promotional aids, government relations, an information center, and a charge card servicing package.

Review Date: January 20, 2012

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