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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting public health activities in the United States. CDC's Mission is to collaborate to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health – through health promotion, prevention of disease, injury and disability, and preparedness for new health threats. CDC is composed of the Office of the Director, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Center for Global Health, and five Offices, including Public Health Preparedness and Response; State and Local Support; Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services; Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health; and Infectious Diseases. CDC employs more than 15,000 employees in more than 50 countries and in 168 occupational categories.

Review Date: February 27, 2013

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National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases - NCIRD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The mission of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) is the prevention of disease, disability, and death through immunization and by control of respiratory and related diseases. NCIRD balances its efforts in the domestic and global arenas as well as accommodates the specific needs of all populations at risk of vaccine preventable diseases from children to older adults.

Review Date: August 10, 2011

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NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases – NIAID

NIAID conducts and supports basic and applied research to better understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases. For more than 60 years, NIAID research has led to new therapies, vaccines, diagnostic tests, and other technologies that have improved the health of millions of people in the United States and around the world.

Review Date: June 26, 2014

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NIH National Institute on Aging

NIA, one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of NIH, leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life. In 1974, Congress granted authority to form NIA to provide leadership in aging research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs relevant to aging and older people. Subsequent amendments to this legislation designated the NIA as the primary Federal agency on Alzheimer’s disease research. The Institute's mission is to: •Support and conduct genetic, biological, clinical, behavioral, social, and economic research related to the aging process, diseases and conditions associated with aging, and other special problems and needs of older Americans. •Foster the development of research and clinician scientists in aging. •Communicate information about aging and advances in research on aging to the scientific community, health care providers, and the public.

Review Date: July 14, 2014

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NIH National Institute on Aging

NIA, one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of NIH, leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life. In 1974, Congress granted authority to form NIA to provide leadership in aging research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs relevant to aging and older people. Subsequent amendments to this legislation designated the NIA as the primary Federal agency on Alzheimer’s disease research. The Institute's mission is to: •Support and conduct genetic, biological, clinical, behavioral, social, and economic research related to the aging process, diseases and conditions associated with aging, and other special problems and needs of older Americans. •Foster the development of research and clinician scientists in aging. •Communicate information about aging and advances in research on aging to the scientific community, health care providers, and the public.

Review Date: July 14, 2014

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the United States government’s principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. HHS works closely with state and local governments, and many HHS-funded services are provided at the local level by state or county agencies, or through private sector grantees. The department includes more than 300 programs, covering a wide spectrum of activities. In addition to the services they deliver, the HHS programs provide for equitable treatment of beneficiaries nationwide, and they enable the collection of national health and other data.

Review Date: August 30, 2011

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American Lung Association

The American Lung Association (ALA), formerly the National Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association, was founded in 1904 to combat tuberculosis. Since 1907, ALA has promoted Christmas Seals to raise public funds to fight lung disease, the third leading cause of death in America. ALA is primarily a health education agency, emphasizing anti-smoking and clean air activities to prevent and control lung hazards. Its self-management programs teach those suffering from lung disease, such as asthma, how to live with their condition. ALA also creates educational programs to teach lifelong good health habits, and it provides professional education to health care providers to help them deliver effective lung health care to their patients. ALA also awards grants for medical research and sponsors fellowships for young medical professionals to encourage them to specialize in pulmonary care. There are 110 State and local Lung Associations throughout the country. The American Thoracic Society is the medical arm of ALA.

Review Date: November 24, 2008

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American Public Health Association

The American Public Health Association (APHA), formed in 1872, serves the interests of professionals in the public health field. APHA services include publications, annual meetings, programs for each of 25 special interest fields, low-cost group insurance, awards, and career opportunity listings. APHA activities include setting standards for solving health problems, research, health improvement programs, public awareness campaigns, and legislative action.

Review Date: May 04, 2011

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Immunization Action Coalition

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) works to increase immunization rates and prevent disease by creating and distributing educational materials for health professionals and the public that enhance the delivery of safe and effective immunization services. The Coalition also facilitates communication about the safety, efficacy, and use of vaccines within the broad immunization community of patients, parents, health care organizations, and government health agencies. IAC distributes consumer information and health professional resources in English and up to 50 other languages including Spanish, Farsi, Arabic, Russian, Tagalog, Chinese, and more.

Review Date: December 05, 2011

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National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) is a non-profit, tax-exempt (501c3) organization founded in 1973 and dedicated to educating the public and healthcare professionals about the causes, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. NFID and the National Coalition for Adult Immunization sponsor an influenza and pneumococcal immunization awareness campaign annually to remind millions of Americans of the risks of influenza and pneumococcal disease, and ways of preventing them or their complications.

Review Date: June 21, 2011

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World Health Organization

The World Health Organization (WHO) came into being on April 7, 1948 when the 26th United Nations member ratified its Constitution. The objective of WHO is the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health. In support of its main objective, the WHO has a wide range of functions including the following: to act as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work; to promote technical cooperation; to assist Governments, upon request, in strengthening health services; to furnish appropriate technical assistance, and in emergencies, necessary aid; to stimulate and advance work on the prevention and control of epidemic, endemic and other diseases; to promote, in cooperation with other specialized agencies where necessary, the improvement of nutrition, housing, sanitation, recreation, economic or working conditions and other aspects of environmental hygiene; to promote and coordinate biomedical and health services research; to promote improved standards of teaching and training in the health, medical and related professions; to establish and stimulate the establishment of international standards for biological, pharmaceutical and similar products, and to standardize diagnostic procedures; and to foster activities in the field of mental health, especially those activities affecting the harmony of human relations. WHO also proposes conventions, agreements, regulations and makes recommendations about international nomenclature of diseases, causes of death and public health practices. It develops, establishes and promotes international standards concerning foods and biological, pharmaceutical and similar substances.

Review Date: January 05, 2009

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