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Native American Health

Administration for Native Americans, Administration for Children and Families/HHS

The Administration for Native Americans (ANA) was established in 1974 through the Native American Programs Act (NAPA). ANA is the only federal agency serving all Native Americans, including 562 federally recognized Tribes, American Indian and Alaska Native organizations, Native Hawaiian organizations and Native populations throughout the Pacific basin (including American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). The mission of ANA is to promote the goal of self-sufficiency and cultural preservation for Native Americans by providing social and economic development opportunities through financial assistance, training, and technical assistance to eligible Tribes and Native American communities, including American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and other Native Pacific Islanders organizations.

Review Date: June 22, 2011

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American Indian Environmental Office, EPA

Within EPA, the American Indian Environmental Office (AIEO) coordinates the Agency-wide effort to strengthen public health and environmental protection in Indian country, with a special emphasis on helping tribes administer their own environmental programs. AIEO manages the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP). The GAP provides grant funding to federally-recognized tribes and intertribal consortia through a negotiated process administered by each EPA Region. The grant funds may be used by tribes to plan and carry out a number of environmental capacity-building activities.

Review Date: September 07, 2011

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Bureau of Indian Affairs

The mission of the Bureau of Indian Affairs is to act as the principle agent of the United States in carrying out the government-to-government relationship that exists between the United States and the federally-recognized American Indians, Indian tribes and Alaska Natives; and, to act as principle agent of the United States in carrying out the responsibilities the United States has as a trustee for property it holds for federally-recognized tribes and individual American Indians.

Review Date: January 07, 2009

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Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services, is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The provision of health services to members of federally-recognized tribes grew out of the special government-to-government relationship between the federal government and Indian tribes. This relationship, established in 1787, is based on Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, and has been given form and substance by numerous treaties, laws, Supreme Court decisions, and Executive Orders. The IHS is the principal federal health care provider and health advocate for Indian people, and its goal is to raise their health status to the highest possible level. The IHS provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives who belong to 566 federally recognized tribes in 35 states. Health services provided include medical, dental, and environmental health programs. Special program concentrations are in disease prevention and health promotion, alcoholism, substance abuse, suicide, accidents, maternal and child health, nutrition, and public health services.

Review Date: October 17, 2011

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NIH National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities

The mission of the National Center on Minority Health and Disparities (NCMHD) is to lead, coordinate, support, and assess the NIH effort to reduce and ultimately eliminate health disparities. In this effort NCMHD will conduct and support basic, clinical, social, and behavioral research, promote research infrastructure and training, foster emerging programs, disseminate information, and reach out to minority and other health disparity communities.

Review Date: February 15, 2011

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Office of Minority Health and the Office of Minority Health Resource Center

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) was created in 1986 and is one of the most significant outcomes of the 1985 Secretary's Task Force Report on Black and Minority Health. OMH's primary responsibility is to improve health and healthcare outcomes for racial and ethnic minority communities by developing or advancing policies, programs, and practices that address health, social, economic, environmental and other factors which impact health. OMH is committed to culturally and linguistically competent systems that will ensure the needs of minority communities are integrated and addressed within health-related programs across the nation. OMH programs address disease prevention, health promotion, risk reduction, healthier lifestyle choices, use of health care services, and barriers to health care.

Review Date: June 29, 2011

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Office of Tribal Justice, U.S. Department of Justice

The Office of Tribal Justice is the primary point of contact for the Department of Justice with federally recognized Native American tribes, and advises the Department on legal and policy matters pertaining to Native Americans: Provide a single point of contact within the Department for meeting the broad and complex federal responsibilities owed to federally recognized Indian tribes. Promote internal uniformity of Department policies and litigating positions relating to Indian country. Advise Department components litigating, protecting or otherwise addressing Native American rights and/or related issues. Ensure that the Department clearly communicates policies and positions to tribal leaders. Maintain liaison with federally recognized tribes, and work with the appropriate federal, state, and local officials, professional associations, and public interest groups. Coordinate, together with the Office of Legislative Affairs, the Department's legislative efforts relating to Indian country.

Review Date: November 30, 2011

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Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board

The Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board is established in order to provide the Indian people of the Aberdeen Area with a formal representative Board as a means of communicating and participation with the Aberdeen Area Indian Health Service and other health agencies and organizations on health matters.

Review Date: December 08, 2008

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Alaska Native Knowledge Network

The Alaska Native Knowledge Network is designed to serve as a resource for compiling and exchanging information related to Alaska Native knowledge systems and ways of knowing. It has been established to assist Native people, government agencies, educators and the general public in gaining access to the knowledge base that Alaska Natives have acquired through cumulative experience over millennia.

Review Date: December 11, 2010

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Alaska Native Science Commission

The mission of the Alaska Native Science Commission is to endorse and support scientific research that enhances and perpetuates Alaska Native cultures and ensures the protection of indigenous cultures and intellectual property.

Review Date: November 20, 2008

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Alaskan AIDS Assistance Association

The mission of the Alaskan AIDS Assistance Association (Four A’s) is to be a key collaborator within the state of Alaska in the provision of supportive services to persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families and in the elimination of the transmission of HIV infection and its stigma.

Review Date: January 05, 2009

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Association of American Indian Physicians

The mission of the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) is to pursue excellence in Native American health care by promoting education in the medical disciplines, honoring traditional healing practices and restoring the balance of mind, body, and spirit. AAIP seeks to accomplish its mission by offering educational programs, services and activities that motivate American Indian and Alaska Native students to remain in the academic pipeline and to pursue a career in the health professions and/or biomedical research. AAIP also provides leadership in various health care arenas affecting American Indians and Alaska Natives such as diabetes mellitus, HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, and methamphetamine use.

Review Date: December 19, 2011

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Indian Country Child Trauma Center

The Indian Country Child Trauma Center (ICCTC) was established to develop trauma-related treatment protocols, outreach materials, and service delivery guidelines specifically designed for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and their families. The Indian Country Child Trauma Center is part of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network funded by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) under the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative.

Review Date: October 13, 2011

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Indians Into Medicine Program

Indians into Medicine (INMED) is a comprehensive education program assisting Indian students who are preparing for health careers. Located at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Grand Forks, INMED support services include academic and personal support for college and professional students, assistance with financial aid application, and summer enrichment sessions at the junior high through professional school levels.

Review Date: March 30, 2011

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Mending the Sacred Hoop Technical Assistance Project

The Mending the Sacred Hoop Technical Assistance Project (MSH-TA) is a Native American program that provides training and technical assistance to its American Indian and Alaskan Native relations in the effort to eliminate violence in the lives of women and their children. MSH-TA works with villages, reservations, rancherias and pueblos across the United States to improve the justice system, law enforcement, and service provider response to the issues of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking in Native communities.

Review Date: September 30, 2011

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National Indian Child Welfare Association

National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) is a nonprofit Indian child and family organization formed to assist Indian programs and communities to strengthen and enhance their capacity to deliver quality child welfare services. NICWA is a membership organization with a 26 member all-Indian board of directors. Members include tribes, individuals, both Indian and non-Indian, and private organizations from around the United States concerned with Indian child and family issues.

Review Date: October 05, 2011

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National Indian Health Board, Inc.

The National Indian Health Board (NIHB) represents Tribal governments—both those that operate their own health care delivery systems through contracting and compacting, and those receiving health care directly from the Indian Health Service (IHS). The NIHB, a non-profit organization, provides a variety of services to tribes, Area Health Boards, Tribal organizations, federal agencies, and private foundations, including advocacy, policy formation and analysis, legislative and regulatory tracking, direct and timely communication with Tribes, research on Indian health issues, program development and assessment, training and technical assistance programs, and project management. The NIHB continually presents the Tribal perspective while monitoring federal legislation, and opening opportunities to network with other national health care organizations to engage their support on Indian health care issues.

Review Date: February 02, 2011

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National Indian Women's Health Resource Center

The National Indian Women's Health Resource Center (NIWHRC), is a 501-c-3 non-profit organization whose mission is to assist American Indian and Alaska Native women in achieving and maintaining optimal health and cultural well-being for themselves, their families and their communities. The NIWHRC's goal is the establishment of a national Indian women's health network that promotes advocacy, education, policy, development, appropriate research, and encouragement of healthy lifestyle behaviors within cultural context.

Review Date: February 09, 2011

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National Native American AIDS Prevention Center

Founded in 1987 by American Indian and Alaska Native activists, social workers and public health professionals, the National Native American AIDS Prevention Center (NNAAPC) is the national leader in addressing HIV/AIDS issues that impact Native communities. NNAAPC seeks to address these issues through its work in the areas of public health, community advocacy and mobilization, training and technical assistance, and communications/media. The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center (NNAAPC) helps organizations that serve Native communities to plan, develop and manage HIV/AIDS prevention, intervention, care and treatment programs.

Review Date: October 05, 2011

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National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Elders

The National Resource Center (NRC) for American Indian, Alaska Native & Native Hawaiian Elders is a grant project of the U.S. Administration on Aging. The goals of this project are to: assess the current status of Native Elders in Alaska; develop an understanding of the cultural values that drive expectations and perceived needs for care; and document "best, promising and emerging practices" that are in current use. Additional goals include soliciting recommendations for community responses to elder abuse, exploitation and violence that are appropriate to Alaska Native cultures and providing education to medical providers.

Review Date: October 13, 2011

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National Resource Center on Native American Aging

The National Resource Center on Native American Aging (NRCNAA), established at the University of North Dakota (UND) in Grand Forks, is a Cooperative Agreement with the Administration on Aging, United States Department of Health and Human Services. The resource center is a collaboration between the UND Office of American Indian Student Services (formerly the Office of Native American Programs) and the UND Center for Rural Health. The resource center’s purpose is to work closely with the local service providers throughout the nation to address the needs of American Indian, Alaskan Native and Native Hawaiian elders. The resource center provides education, training, technical assistance, and research. It also assists in developing community-based solutions to improve the quality of life and the delivery of related support services to the Native elderly population.

Review Date: September 22, 2011

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Native CIRCLE: The American Indian/Alaska Native Cancer Information Resource Center and Learning Exchange

The American Indian/Alaska Native Cancer Information Resource Center and Learning Exchange (Native C.I.R.C.L.E.) exists to stimulate, develop, maintain and disseminate culturally appropriate cancer information materials for American Indian/Alaska Native educators, healthcare leaders and students.

Review Date: September 15, 2011

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One Sky Center

One Sky Center is a National Resource Center for American Indians and Alaska Natives. It is dedicated to improving prevention and treatment of substance abuse and mental health across Indian Country. The objectives of the National Resource Center include: (1) promote and nurture effective and culturally appropriate mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment services for Native populations; (2) identify culturally appropriate, effective evidence-based mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment practices and disseminate them so that they can be applied successfully across diverse tribal communities; and (3) provide technical assistance, training and products to expand the capacity and quality of mental heath and substance abuse prevention and treatment practitioners serving Native populations.

Review Date: October 05, 2011

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