U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Poisoning Prevention

Poison Help

Call Poison Help (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center, if someone may have been poisoned – even if you’re not sure.

Review Date: Saturday, October 29, 2011

Health Resources and Services Administration - HRSA
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Find Your Local Poison Center

This list offers local and certified poison centers located in the Unites States and its territories. You may also find your local poison center by calling 1-800-222-1222.

Review Date: Tuesday, November 13, 2012

American Association of Poison Control Centers

Carbon Monoxide Questions and Answers

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a deadly, colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. This page provides information on what the symptoms of CO poisoning are, how CO is produced, what one should do to prevent CO poisoning, and more.

Review Date: Tuesday, December 23, 2014

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

FAQs: Poison Prevention

Get answers to frequently asked questions about the National Poison Prevention Week and tips to help prevent accidental poisonings.

Review Date: Monday, January 28, 2013

Poison Prevention Week Council

Animal Poison Control Center

The ASPCA offers veterinary advice for any animal poison-related emergency, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you think that your pet may have ingested a potentially poisonous substance, call 1-888-426-4435.

Review Date: Wednesday, November 26, 2014

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

Protect Your Family from Lead

Lead is a highly toxic metal that may cause a range of health problems, especially in young children. If your home was built before 1978, learn what you can do to protect your child from lead poisoning.

Review Date: Tuesday, January 26, 2016

HUD USER, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

A CO Alarm Can Save Your Life

Learn about the importance of replacing batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms annually.

Review Date: Friday, October 31, 2014

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

About Lead-Based Paint

Lead is a highly toxic metal that may cause a range of health problems, especially in young children. If your home was built before 1978, learn what you can do to protect your child from lead poisoning.

Review Date: Tuesday, October 07, 2014

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Arsenic in Drinking Water

Studies have linked long-term exposure of arsenic in drinking water to a variety of cancers in humans. To protect human health, an EPA standard limits the amount of arsenic in drinking water at .010 parts per million (10 parts per billion) to protect consumers.

Review Date: Tuesday, March 26, 2013

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention- (PDF)

Learn how you can protect yourself and your family from harmful exposure to carbon monoxide (CO), an odorless, colorless gas that can cause illness and death.

Review Date: Wednesday, January 13, 2016

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

CPSC Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hazard with Camping Equipment- (PDF)

From 2006-2010 there were at least 26 people who died from carbon monoxide poising associated with camping equipment, including grills, lanterns, and stoves. Follow these guidelines to prevent this colorless, odorless gas from poisoning you and your family.

Review Date: Thursday, March 03, 2016

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Fentanyl Patch Can Be Deadly to Children

The FDA issued a safety alert to warn patients, caregivers and health care professionals about the dangers of accidental exposure to and improper storage and disposal of the fentanyl patch. Find out how to protect children from accidental exposure.

Review Date: Friday, April 20, 2012

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Keep Young Children Safe from Poisoning

Use these quick tips to prevent accidental poisoning at home.

Review Date: Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Lead Hotline - The National Lead Information Center

Contact the National Lead Information Center to receive a general information packet, to order other documents, or for detailed information or questions.

Review Date: Tuesday, October 07, 2014

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Pesticide Safety Tips

Pesticides can be dangerous when used carelessly or not stored properly. Learn more about pest control and pesticide safety.

Review Date: Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Office of Pesticide Programs, OCSPP, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Poison Prevention - Fact Sheets & Safety Tips

Medications, household cleaners and even a leaky gas furnace can pose serious poisoning risks to your kids. Keeping potentially dangerous substances out of little hands is a sure way to prevent unintentional poisoning.

Review Date: Friday, October 31, 2014

Safe Kids Worldwide

Poison Prevention Tips

Check out these tips on how to prevent poisonings from medicines and other household and chemical products.

Review Date: Tuesday, January 19, 2016

American Association of Poison Control Centers

Poison Prevention: Be Aware, Know the Facts- (PDF)

Information about household products and substances that are poisonous and tips on what to do if poisoning occurs.

Review Date: Tuesday, November 13, 2012

American Association of Poison Control Centers

Poison-proof Your Home: One Room at a Time Checklist- (PDF)

This checklist provides a list of activities and action steps that can help parents and caregivers identify sources of pesticide and other household product dangers at home.

Review Date: Wednesday, January 13, 2016

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Tips to Protect Children from Environmental Hazards

Follow these simple steps to protect your children from environmental hazards around the home.

Review Date: Monday, January 18, 2016

Office of Pesticide Programs, OCSPP, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

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