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Abledata

AbleData provides information on assistive products and rehabilitation equipment for people with disabilities. AbleData's most significant resource is the AbleData database of assistive technology, which contains objective information on over 40,000 assistive products. Each product listing provides a detailed description of the product's functions and features, price information (when available), and contact information for the product's manufacturer and distributors. AbleData also offers information on non-commercial prototypes, customized and one-of-a-kind products, and do-it-yourself designs. All of AbleData’s information resources are available for free at www.abledata.com. Staff are available to respond to telephone, email or written requests, 8:30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. AbleData is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, U.S. Department of Education.

Review Date: December 23, 2010

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Access Board: United States Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board

Created in 1973, the Board is the federal agency which develops minimum guidelines and requirements for standards issued under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA), develops accessibility guidelines for telecommunications equipment and customer premises equipment under the Telecommunications Act, develops accessibility standards for electronic and information technology under section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, provides technical assistance on those guidelines and standards, and enforces the Architectural Barriers Act.

Review Date: December 12, 2008

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Clearinghouse on Disability Information, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

The Clearinghouse provides information to people with disabilities, or anyone requesting information, by doing research and providing documents in response to inquiries. The information provided includes areas of federal funding for disability-related programs. Clearinghouse staff is trained to serve as experts in referring requests to other sources of disability-related information, if necessary. This office is in the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) which is divided into three areas: the Office of Special Education Programs, the rehabilitation Services Administration, and the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Information provided may be useful to disabled individuals and their families, schools and universities, teacher's and/or school administrators, and organizations which have persons with disabilities as clients.

Review Date: September 11, 2011

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National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research - NIDRR
U.S. Department of Education

NIDRR's mission is to generate and disseminate research findings and promote knowledge that will improve the ability of individuals with disabilities to perform activities in the community, and increase their full participation in society. NIDRR conducts comprehensive and coordinated participation in programs of research and related activities to maximize the full inclusion, social integration, employment and independent living of individuals al all ages with disabilities. NIDRR's focus includes research in areas such as employment; health and function; technology for access and function; independent living and community integration and other associated disability research areas.

Review Date: November 21, 2008

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National Rehabilitation Information Center, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

National Rehabilitation Information Center, funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, was established in 1977 and provides information on rehabilitation and disability-related materials. NARIC prepares bibliographies tailored to specific requests, and assists in locating answers to questions such as places, names, addresses, and statistics. NARIC's collection includes materials relevant to disability and rehabilitation. The collection contains more than 200 periodical titles and more than 60,000 research reports, books, and audiovisual materials. Coordination and information exchange with other information resources is maintained. The public can use the NARIC collection or order materials from the Center. DATABASE: REHABDATA, an online computerized database, includes bibliographic information and abstracts for the entire NARIC collection, including materials produced from 1950 to the present. Direct access to the database is through the NARIC Web page. Customized searches are available for nominal fees. There is a charge for photo duplication.

Review Date: February 03, 2010

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U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

The Veterans Administration was established in 1930 and elevated to cabinet level on March 15, 1989, and is now the Department of Veterans Affairs. The VA provides a wide range of veterans' benefits in such areas as health care, education, housing, disability pensions, and life insurance. Through its network of hospitals, clinics, and nursing homes, the VA provides a full range of medical, long-term care, and patient support services. Veterans with service-related illnesses or injuries receive priority for VA medical services, and special consideration is also given to veterans who are in financial need, over 65 years old, or holders of the Congressional Medal of Honor. The VA is also involved in medical research and the training of health professionals. Training programs include graduate, undergraduate, and continuing education, a medical library, and assistance for health manpower training institutions. VA benefits are restricted to U.S. military veterans.

Review Date: December 12, 2008

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Academy of Doctors of Audiology

Established in 1977, the Academy of Dispensing Audiologists (ADA) is a national organization that fosters and supports the professional dispensing of hearing aids by qualified audiologists in rehabilitative practice, encourages audiology training programs to include pertinent aspects of hearing aid dispensing in their curricula, supports research in relevant areas of aural rehabilitation, works cooperatively with individuals and organizations in improving hearing aid dispensing services, and provides guidance for audiologists interested in dispensing hearing aids as part of their rehabilitative practice.

Review Date: December 09, 2009

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American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

The American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation was founded to maximize the quality of life while minimizing the incidence, severity and prevalence of physical impairments and disabilities. The AAPM&R also promotes societal health and enhances the understanding of the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation. AAPM&R is the national medical specialty society of more than 6,500 physiatrists - physicians specializing in physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Review Date: August 27, 2008

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American Leprosy Missions

American Leprosy Missions (ALM), founded in 1906, is a nonprofit, Christian medical mission supporting more than 100 programs in approximately 20 countries. ALM provides anti-leprosy drugs, surgical intervention for disabilities, training of health workers, research, public information programs, and physical and vocational rehabilitation assistance. The Mission collaborates with member agencies of the International Federation of Anti-Leprosy Associations (ILEP) and Christian medical missions.

Review Date: January 02, 2009

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American Music Therapy Association

Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. The American Music Therapy Association works to advance public awareness of the benefits of music therapy and to increase access to quality music therapy services in a rapidly changing world.

Review Date: January 13, 2012

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American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

The American Occupational Therapy Association is a national professional society established in 1917 to represent the interests and concerns of occupational therapy practitioners, and to improve the quality of occupational therapy services. Occupational therapy is a vital health care service whose practitioners help to restore and sustain the highest quality of productive life to persons recovering from illnesses or injuries, or coping with developmental disabilities or changes resulting from the aging process. Current AOTA membership numbers approximately 42,000, including occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants, and occupational therapy students. Members reside in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 65 foreign countries. AOTA's major programs and activities are directed toward assuring the quality of occupational services; improving consumer access to healthcare services, and promoting the professional development of members.

Review Date: February 14, 2013

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American Physical Therapy Association

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), is a national professional organization representing physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students throughout the United States. The Association's efforts are directed toward serving its members and the public by increasing the understanding of the physical therapist's role in the nation's health care system and by fostering improvements in physical therapy education, practice and research. Headquartered in Alexandria, Virginia, APTA works to fulfill its objectives in the areas of accreditation, clinical research, continuing education, legislative representation, minority and international issues, practice issues, publications, and more.

Review Date: January 19, 2012

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Better Hearing Institute

The Better Hearing Institute (BHI) is a not-for-profit corporation that educates the public about the neglected problem of hearing loss and what can be done about it. Founded in 1973, BHI is working to (1) erase the stigma and end the embarrassment that prevents millions of people from seeking help for hearing loss (2) show the negative consequences of untreated hearing loss for millions of Americans (3) promote treatment and demonstrate that this is a national problem that can be solved. BHI uses the media, the web site and other communications forums to give the facts about hearing loss and promote better hearing; produces and disseminates educational materials; conducts authoritative research on the incidence of hearing loss, the benefits of treatment, the consequences of ignoring it and related topics; operates a call center for consumers who have questions about hearing loss. (Call 1-800-EARWELL.)

Review Date: April 28, 2011

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Birth Defect Research for Children, Inc.

Birth Defect Research for Children, Inc. (BDRC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides parents and expectant parents with information about birth defects and support services for their children. BDRC has a parent-matching program that links families who have children with similar birth defects. BDRC also sponsors the National Birth Defect Registry, a research project that studies associations between birth defects and exposures to radiation, medication, alcohol, smoking, chemicals, pesticides, lead, mercury, dioxin and other environmental toxins. Each year, BDRC responds to thousands of birth defect information requests from all over the world. BDRC's on-line environmental health updates provide thousands of parents, professionals and organizations with daily news on the latest birth defect research.

Review Date: February 19, 2013

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Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation

The Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation (CPR) is a research, training, and service organization dedicated to improving the lives of persons who have psychiatric disabilities by improving the effectiveness of people, programs, and service systems. The Center's mission is to increase knowledge in the field of psychiatric rehabilitation; to train treatment personnel; to develop effective rehabilitation programs; and to assist in organizing both personnel and programs into efficient and coordinated service delivery systems. The Center is affiliated with Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences and the Department of Rehabilitation Counseling at Boston University.

Review Date: December 15, 2008

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Colorado Department of Human Services

Colorado Department of Human Services consists of over 7,500 county or state employees dedicated to providing human services to Colorado residents. It provides services through 63 county or district departments of social services, 2 State Maternal Health Institutes, 10 Youth Corrections Facilities, 5 Nursing Homes, 28 Vocational Rehabilitation Offices, 3 regional Centers for persons with developmental disabilities, and numerous community-based public and private providers. In addition CDHS contracts with several agencies to provide human services. CDHS also administers and provides oversight for a variety of federally funded programs. The Department has five goals, or desired outcomes, for the individuals and families who receive services. they are: economic self-sufficiency; family and community connections; health and rehabilitation; independent living; and safety.

Review Date: August 30, 2011

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Coma/ Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery Association, Inc.

The goal of the Coma Recovery Association, Inc. is to provide information and referral to families and survivors of coma and head injury, so that they can make informed choices regarding treatment, rehabilitation and socialization alternatives. Also offers support groups and conferences.

Review Date: March 18, 2009

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Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities

The mission of CARF is to promote the quality, value, and optimal outcomes of services through a consultative accreditation process that centers on enhancing the lives of the persons served. CARF develops and maintains current, field-driven standards that improve the value and responsiveness of the programs and services delivered to people in need of rehabilitation and other life enhancement services; recognizes organizations that achieve accreditation through a consultative peer-review process and demonstrate their commitment to the continuous improvement of their programs and services with a focus on the needs and outcomes of the persons served; conducts accreditation research emphasizing outcomes measurement and management; provides information on common program strengths as well as areas needing improvement; and provides consultation, education, training, and publications that support organizations in achieving and maintaining accreditation of their programs and services.

Review Date: July 16, 2008

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Disabled American Veterans

The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) was chartered by Congress in 1932 as the official voice of the disabled veteran; it is not an agency of the Federal government, nor does it receive government funding. The DAV is a nonprofit association of 1,000,000 wartime disabled veterans, serving 2.5 million disabled veterans and their families. The DAV's national service program is rooted in 68 United States cities where 300 national service officers work to provide counseling, employment services, and assistance in gaining health care, free of charge to all disabled veterans. Many also visit towns and cities throughout the country in service vans. Perhaps its most important function is counseling veterans in completing the paperwork of applying for benefits from the Veterans Administration. All veterans and members of their families are eligible for the DAV's services. However, membership is limited to service-connected disabled veterans only.

Review Date: January 23, 2009

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Disabled Sports USA

A national nonprofit, 501(c)(3), organization established in 1967 by disabled Vietnam veterans to serve the war injured. DS/USA now offers nationwide sports rehabilitation programs to anyone with a permanent disability. Activities include winter skiing, water sports, summer and winter competitions, fitness and special sports events. Participants include those with visual impairments, amputations, spinal cord injury, dwarfism, multiple sclerosis, head injury, cerebral palsy, and other neuromuscular and orthopedic conditions. DS/USA's national office provides technical assistance to its local chapters and other recreation programs so they can better serve the disabled population in their communities. The organization has a nationwide network of community-based chapters. DS/USA conducts an annual “The Hartford Ski Spectacular” in Breckenridge, CO, the largest winter sports event for physically disabled people in the U.S. and “The International Challenge Track and Field” event.

Review Date: January 12, 2012

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Easter Seals Inc.

Easter Seals has been helping individuals with disabilities and special needs, and their families, live better lives for nearly 90 years. From child development centers to physical rehabilitation and job training for people with disabilities, Easter Seals offers a variety of services to help people with disabilities address life's challenges and achieve personal goals. Easter Seals offers help, hope and answers to more than a million children and adults living with autism and other disabilities or special needs and their families each year. Services and support are provided through a network of more than 550 sites in the U.S. and through Ability First Australia. Each center provides exceptional services that are individualized, innovative, family-focused and tailored to meet specific needs of the particular community served. Easter Seals also advocates for the passage of legislation to help people with disabilities achieve independence, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Passed in 1990, the ADA prohibits discrimination against anyone who has a mental or physical disability, guaranteeing the civil rights of people with disabilities.

Review Date: May 31, 2011

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Families of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Families of Spinal Muscular Atrophy was founded to support families with members suffering from the condition and to promote research into treatments for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Spinal muscular atrophy is a group of diseases which affect all age groups, from newborns to adults. The diseases included under spinal muscular atrophy are: Infantile Progressive Spinal Muscular Atrophy (Werdnig-Hoffmann Disease), Juvenile Progressive Spinal Muscular Atrophy (Kugelberg-Welander Disease), and Adult Progressive Spinal Muscular Atrophy (Aran-Duchenne Type).

Review Date: October 26, 2011

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Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind, Inc.

The Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind provides trained dogs for qualified blind persons. The Foundation is a nonprofit organization incorporated under the Membership Corporation Laws of New York. It is supported entirely by voluntary contributions. There is no charge for its service, which includes a guide dog, four weeks of training in the dog's use and care, board and lodging while the student is in residence at the Foundation's training center, transportation costs within the continental U.S., and a follow up program. The Foundation aims to give blind persons better mobility, and to contribute to the rehabilitation progress of able citizens so that they can gain social integration and increased job opportunity for self-sufficiency.

Review Date: August 26, 2008

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Guiding Eyes for the Blind

Guiding Eyes is an internationally accredited, nonprofit guide dog school with a 50-plus year legacy of providing the blind and visually impaired with superior Guiding Eyes dogs, training, and lifetime support services. Guiding Eyes for the Blind is dedicated to enriching the lives of blind and visually impaired men and women by providing them with the freedom to travel safely, thereby assuring greater independence, dignity and new horizons of opportunity.

Review Date: January 13, 2012

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Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults

The mission of the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults (HKNC) is to enable all those who are deaf-blind to live and work the community of their choice. It provides comprehensive vocational rehabilitation training at its headquarters in New York and assistance with job and residential placements when training is completed. Services in the field include 10 regional offices, over 40 affiliated agencies, a National Training Team and an Older Adult Program. HKNC is a partner in the National Technical Assistance Consortium for Children and Young Adults Who are Deaf-Blind and with DB-LINK, a clearinghouse for information on deaf-blindness. HKNC also maintains a national registry of individuals who are deaf-blind.

Review Date: May 31, 2011

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House Research Institute

The House Research Institute (formerly House Ear Institute) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with hearing loss and related disorders through scientific research, patient care, and the sharing of knowledge. Institute scientists investigate hearing loss and ear disease at the cellular, molecular and genetic levels, as well as the complex neurological interactions between the auditory system and brain. The researchers also study ways to improve auditory implants, diagnostics, clinical treatments and intervention methods. Outreach programs for the public serve people with hearing loss and related disorders as well as offer information about general hearing health and hearing conservation.

Review Date: October 27, 2011

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International Association of Laryngectomees

The International Association of Laryngectomees (IAL), consists of local clubs worldwide that provide services and information to patients who have undergone laryngectomies and their families. Members are given information on first aid, postoperative care, rehabilitation, esophageal speech, and other speech alternatives. IAL conducts meetings and conferences and publishes pamphlets and a newsletter. Single copies of some publications are free on request.

Review Date: June 07, 2011

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Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University provides information, training, and technical assistance for parents and professionals to meet the needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The Clerc Center serves as a centralized source of information related to deaf and hard of hearing children from birth through age 21 in the United States and also maintains two demonstration schools, Kendall Demonstration Elementary School and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf.

Review Date: July 28, 2009

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National Federation of the Blind

The National Federation of the Blind (NFB), established in 1940 as an organization of blind persons, serves as both an advocacy and a public information vehicle. NFB contacts newly blind persons to help them with adjustment problems, provides information on services available from governmental and private agencies and on applicable laws and regulations, provides scholarships, and assists blind persons who are the victims of discrimination or whose rights have been denied. NFB monitors legislation for blind persons and evaluates and promotes new technology useful to the blind. NFB prepares pamphlets and uses public appearances to educate the public to the fact that the blind are normal individuals who can compete on terms of equality with others.

Review Date: November 24, 2008

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National Foundation for Facial Reconstruction

The National Foundation for Facial Reconstruction, formerly The Society for the Rehabilitation of the Facially Disfigured, was founded to help provide treatment and reconstructive surgery to facially disfigured patients who are unable to afford private care; to train health professionals in the reconstructive surgery field; to encourage research; and to educate the public. To provide multidisciplinary treatment services, the Foundation sponsors the Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery located at the New York University Medical Center, which encompasses ten plastic surgery clinics, and education and research laboratories.

Review Date: August 21, 2008

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National Institute for Rehabilitation Engineering

The National Institute for Rehabilitation Engineering (NIRE), formed in 1967, provides custom-made devices, training, and onsite services for severely and multiply handicapped individuals. The purpose of the N.I.R.E. is to use today's technology to help people with disabilities to be more independent and self-sufficient in their everyday lives. The Institute is an onsite technology training organization and research and development facility, and designs custom-made devices for handicapped persons who are trial-fitted, trained, counseled, and evaluated in the field. NIRE's outreach programs provide most of their services and aids locally in schools, clinics, homes, and places of employment. The N.I.R.E. assists people of all ages with all types of disabilities. Services are offered with a sliding fee scale, and nobody is denied service based on inability to pay.

Review Date: November 24, 2008

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National Rehabilitation Association

National Rehabilitation Association (NRA) was founded in 1925 to promote the vocational rehabilitation of persons with disabilities through advocacy, professional development, and public education. State and federal legislation designed to meet the needs of persons with disabilities is promoted. Conferences, meetings, continuing education, and seminars are sponsored to improve treatment and rehabilitation methods. Membership also includes publications and participation in a special interest division dealing with job placement, independent living, counseling, vocational adjustment, rehabilitation instruction, administration, private sector rehabilitation, multicultural interests, or other topics of concern to members.

Review Date: November 25, 2008

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National Stroke Association

The National Stroke Association (NSA), founded in 1984, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to educating stroke survivors, families, health care professionals, and the general public about stroke. It seeks to reduce the incidence and impact of stroke through activities related to prevention, medical care, research, rehabilitation, and resocialization. NSA develops and distributes educational materials and a new full color magazine "Stroke Smart"; publishes a stroke journal; operates a national clearinghouse for information and referral; promotes research and disseminates research findings; advocates; develops workshops; provides guidance in developing stroke clubs and stroke support groups; operates a Stroke Center Network program to help professionals provide the best services to stroke patients; and offers a Clinical Trials Acceleration Program.

Review Date: March 09, 2011

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Paralyzed Veterans of America

Paralyzed Veterans of America was founded following World War II to meet the needs of veterans who were paralyzed as a result of disease or injury to the spinal cord. Paralyzed Veterans is supported by donations from the general public. It works to ensure quality health care, rehabilitation, and full civil rights for veterans with spinal cord injuries or diseases, and all persons with a disability. Paralyzed Veterans supports legislation and advances in medicine and technology through various programs, departments and foundations such as: PVA Research Foundation; PVA Education Foundation; National Advocacy Program; National Legislation Program; National Veterans Benefits Program; and PVA National Sports and Recreation Program.

Review Date: November 02, 2011

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Post-Polio Health International

The mission of Post-Polio Health International, including International Ventilator Users Network, is to enhance the lives and independence of polio survivors and home mechanical ventilator users by promoting education, networking, and advocacy among these individuals and healthcare providers. Audiences addressed include consumers, professionals, survivors of polio, rehabilitation health professionals, neurologists and pulmonologists. Requests for information may be received by telephone, mail, e-mail and in person.

Review Date: February 26, 2013

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Spinal Cord Injury Information Network

The SPINALCORD Injury Information Network offers educational and research information relevant to persons with spinal cord injuries, their families, and others of interest. Within this site, there is original information managed by the UAB Model SCI System along with the links to web sites around the world that contain SCI educational and research information along with the general disability related information.

Review Date: July 28, 2010

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Stuttering Foundation of America

The Stuttering Foundation provides free online resources, services and support to those who stutter and their families, as well as support for research into the causes of stuttering. We are the largest - and the first - nonprofit charitable organization in the world working towards the prevention and improved treatment of stuttering, reaching over a million people annually. We also offer extensive educational programs on stuttering for professionals. The Stuttering Foundation also offers a Spanish language site, La Fundación Americana de la Tartamudez, which can be accessed at: http://www.tartamudez.org/.

Review Date: February 14, 2013

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TASH: Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion for People with Disabilities

TASH is an international grassroots leader in advancing inclusive communities through research, education and advocacy. Founded in 1975 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, TASH advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with the most significant disabilities and support needs-those most vulnerable to segregation, abuse, neglect and institutionalization. The inclusive practices they validate through research have been shown to improve outcomes for all people.

Review Date: January 16, 2009

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Wheelchair & Ambulatory Sports, USA

Wheelchair & Ambulatory Sports, USA (WASUSA) organizes and governs disabled sports in the United States. Its activities are managed by its Board of Directors, National Governing Bodies, and Sport Technical Committees which maintain rules on disabled athletics, records rule changes, maintains records, selects sites for national championship meets, sanctions meets, and promotes disabled sports. The organization believes in the positive psychological aspects of a rehabilitation program of competitive sports, and hopes that the media attention gained from sponsoring meets will serve to educate the public. WASUSA offers the following sports: archery, athletics, handcycling, shooting, swimming, table tennis, billiards, weightlifting and fencing. Membership is available for a fee.

Review Date: June 12, 2012

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